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Thread: 3D Scanning

  1. #1
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    Question 3D Scanning

    I'm new to 3D scanning, but I've had an idea I've wanted to explore for a long time. It basically involves scanning large objects (car sized) in the outdoors in quite high detail. Many of the cheaper models seem best suited to controlled indoor environments, but I've recently found a distributor for the Evatronix range and they look perfect.

    Is it normally possible to try before you buy? Or are there rental places (in the UK) for these type of professional level products? Failing that, are there cheaper models which are similarly heavy duty?

  2. #2
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    Most high end equipment manufacturers will do demos for you if you make an appointment and they think they have a possible sale.

  3. #3
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    (and this smells like SPAM!)

  4. #4
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    From a scan perspective, there are micron level data acquisition machines that cost more than your car. The problem is not the "3D" part, it is acquiring and formulating the data from the highly sensitive "probe". The probe is a huge chunk of the cost. It's quality level is what determines accuracy if the downstream processors take advantage of it. The range over which the device offers that level of accuracy is relevant to the end price tag as well. How big a chunk do you want to scan how fast?

    So you want to scan something car sized. How close to real life do you want the scan data to be? How accurate is your stitching software to manage a continuous scan? Does the scanner provide special orientation data with the data capture? How accurate is this special orientation mechanism? What is the sensitivity of the probe and hardware?

    So the answer is simple, cheap and accurate are opposite sizes of the spectrum... what do I really need at what price point.
    If the price point is under $1000, you get hardware and software that is currently commercially or readily available. They just scale the data to meet your needs. Bigger is easier for these machines (more forgiving). They optimize for "rooms" or "people".

    Want to go to the other end of the scope... 3D scan a home for advertising? Now you are talking integrated system. Several $100K for a commercial quality setup.

    The technology is not new. The tech is from the optical measuring systems. They start at $10K and most implementations are well north of $50K.

    If you're doing cars, and you want real quality... you're into a solid 6 figures.

    If you just want to scan the local swap meet hot rods, you better bring a large hard drive, but you can do that for $500.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 07-29-2017 at 02:37 AM.

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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    From a scan perspective, there are micron level data acquisition machines that cost more than your car. The problem is not the "3D" part, it is acquiring and formulating the data from the highly sensitive "probe". The probe is a huge chunk of the cost. It's quality level is what determines accuracy if the downstream processors take advantage of it. The range over which the device offers that level of accuracy is relevant to the end price tag as well. How big a chunk do you want to scan how fast?

    So you want to scan something car sized. How close to real life do you want the scan data to be? How accurate is your stitching software to manage a continuous scan? Does the scanner provide special orientation data with the data capture? How accurate is this special orientation mechanism? What is the sensitivity of the probe and hardware?

    So the answer is simple, cheap and accurate are opposite sizes of the spectrum... what do I really need at what price point.
    If the price point is under $1000, you get hardware and software that is currently commercially or readily available. They just scale the data to meet your needs. Bigger is easier for these machines (more forgiving). They optimize for "rooms" or "people".

    Want to go to the other end of the scope... 3D scan a home for advertising? Now you are talking integrated system. Several $100K for a commercial quality setup.

    The technology is not new. The tech is from the optical measuring systems. They start at $10K and most implementations are well north of $50K.

    If you're doing cars, and you want real quality... you're into a solid 6 figures.

    If you just want to scan the local swap meet hot rods, you better bring a large hard drive, but you can do that for $500.
    Sorry if the car metaphor led to confusion, cars aren't the objective. However, to extend the metaphor slightly... Imagine wanting to 3D scan an object the size of a car in such a way that the main body of the car is in "low/medium" detail, but the door handles can be scanned in "high" detail. How does this affect your choice of hardware/software?

    Also being outdoors (in changeable weather conditions) is a requirement, how much of the available hardware is rugged?

    (Time taken is virtually irrelevant to me at this stage.)

  7. #6
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    That sounds like two scanners. Time is a significant element. If you are willing to "spend the time" instead of "spending the money", it all depends on how you value your time.

 

 

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