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Thread: Universal Hub

  1. #21
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    If you were stateside, I'd be happy to send you a couple of cogs.
    That is definitely a sign something is working way to hard. Rounded out of the box? Wow!
    However, if they are new cartridges, they are still product, so they are still warranted.
    Problem is that they only warrant cartridges sold by their qualified distributors.
    They are really pushing the consumer protection laws in the USA.

    I'm not into risking the heater block either.

    Matching up a pair of nozzles is a pain but now we can just leave it be.
    For the most part, this finally puts the nozzles with the machines rather than the cartridge.
    If only someone would up the count between maintenance warnings.
    I don't -want- to go through the routine again

    The only print I was having trouble with was the bulkhead tubenut in ABS.
    Haven't tried the new filament yet.

    BTW, the groove depth when I turn it on the lathe is 0.4-0.45mm.
    If you can turn a nozzle, you can sure carve a groove with a parting tool

    - - - - - - - - - -

    B2B Bulkhead parts. I've included PLA, ABS, and PETG.

    If you have a #34 drill bit, run it through the center.
    #34 is .111" or 2.8mm

    The design is a snug fit that allows us to remove the barrel nut from inside the driver mechanism.

    If you lack the right size drill bit, some sandpaper or a hobby file will do the trick.
    It doesn't need much adjustment, just smoothing out the bore basically.

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1s5..._r9iPFwnzPX4Fi

    Remember, these drop in for a left side cartridge. Turn them 180 for right side printing.

    The tube segment which has to be salvaged from the original bowden tube is 98-99mm long.
    You can push back the nylon bulkhead and trim that section to length if nothing else.

    Interesting trick to salvage the stock bowden tube is to carefully remove the skeleton.
    If the tubing is not to severely damaged, run one of the parts with the 2.8mm bore over the tube with a bicycle spoke inside.
    This will smooth out and -restore- much of the original shape of the tube.
    The pre-threaded bits won't heal, of course. Just trim those off.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 07-15-2018 at 04:46 PM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    If you were stateside, I'd be happy to send you a couple of cogs.
    I’ll see how desperate I get before I potentially end up begging for you to send it to family west side Thank you!
    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    That is definitely a sign something is working way to hard. Rounded out of the box? Wow!
    However, if they are new cartridges, they are still product, so they are still warranted.
    Problem is that they only warrant cartridges sold by their qualified distributors.
    They are really pushing the consumer protection laws in the USA.
    Bit of an interesting one, I bought my printer from Ebay about two years ago which was previously a demo unit in a retail store, 7 cartridges and the printer 205 all in. Many of these carts are dated from 2014 with no proof of purchase ☹
    I got a bit creative with a t20 bit and a hammer and managed to recover it.
    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    The only print I was having trouble with was the bulkhead tubenut in ABS.
    Haven't tried the new filament yet.
    I’ve printed that and all other parts in 3ds ABS from a stock cartridge and only minor issue is the bulkhead tubenut has a teeny bit of resistance and isn’t as buttery smooth as the print head, the print head bottom is also very weak so any overtightening causes the end to pop off meaning you need to print another, I’ve accidentally done that twice now, DOH!
    On the bright side I just ended up going all texas chainsaw massacre on the tubing and it’s printing admirably, no issues from 3 hours of printing so far.
    B2B.jpg

    lack bracket.jpg
    Last edited by Ardoneye; 07-15-2018 at 05:13 PM.

  3. #23
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    Love to see a success!

    The bottoms of the nozzles shouldn't be weak.
    Were these printed with the stock bowden tube?
    That is where I thought my orange was junk but it turns out it was the stock bowden tube.
    Even the bad prints are stronger that I can break easily.
    My orange is about the same vintage as your green.

    I don't tighten the hot-end tubenut much at all.
    I want to be able to loosen it easily while paused without tripping the nozzle present switch.

    A rougher feel to the bulkhead tubenut is no big deal.
    This is only removed when you have the cartridge in hand anyway.
    The prints are definitely optimized for PLA.

    Does your motor shaft show a lot of wear? You can always swap motors from right to left.

    Can you post an image of where the nozzles are separating?

  4. #24
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    These were printed with a completely standard stock ABS cartridge without modification.
    I was fully tightening the end without paying attention and didn't stop as I didn't encounter any resistance so kept going, the trick with these is to stop tightening when movement on the nozzle has stopped. Overtightening causes the nozzle and spring to protude from the end and the plastic to snap like so:

    brokennozzle.jpg


    Measuring the thickness of the snapped circle at the bottom it's currently measuring in at 1mm.


    The motor looks reasonably fine, I have a feeling the previous owner molested a few previous carts when they were playing up

  5. #25
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    It definitely shouldn't do that, and yes, this is likely due to the stock cartridge.
    This is the exact reason I considered my orange cartridge bad, because the 1st couple of layers were always suspect.
    Not anymore! ...As the B2B without sidewalks is working perfectly now on these parts. PLA was never an issue.
    if you are experiencing some "elephant foot" on the bottom, just carve it smooth with a hobby knife.
    Any "edges" at the base will catch on the hot-end when removing the nozzle.

    Sidewalks will make this a little weaker, only in that the sidewalks are bonded too strongly to the part.
    The only thing I am sure to do is to "shear" the part from the plate rather then bend them over.
    There is a sharp transition after the second layer so this is a highly stressed region on removal from the plate.

    Technically, the bottom ring is only there to manage the push nut when not in the printer.
    Nothing in the hot-end makes contact with this part of the nozzle housing.
    All the work is being done between the top of the "knob" and the "keeper".
    The 3 slots make sure there is additional "bonds" where the body is only 2-traces wide.
    If you have to bend it off the plate, push it backwards while prying at the "knob" when printing from the left side.

    I had given serious thought of putting the nozzle in the printer and using the housing as a keeper only

    - - - - - - - - - -

    NOTICE: If you downloaded the bowden set or the individual tube-nut for the nozzle, you might download the set again.

    Too many variations on the hotend tubenut mixed things up on my end. I've corrected it with the latest download.
    There will be 4 files in the zip rather than the previous 3.

    Sorry if this causes confusion. The correct files have a little extra clearance around the tube and ringlet features.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Ardoneye View Post
    These were printed with a completely standard stock ABS cartridge without modification.
    I was fully tightening the end without paying attention and didn't stop as I didn't encounter any resistance so kept going, the trick with these is to stop tightening when movement on the nozzle has stopped. Overtightening causes the nozzle and spring to protude from the end and the plastic to snap like so:

    brokennozzle.jpg


    Measuring the thickness of the snapped circle at the bottom it's currently measuring in at 1mm.


    The motor looks reasonably fine, I have a feeling the previous owner molested a few previous carts when they were playing up
    D'oh! I know what happened. Or at least a suspect condition.

    I've been rebuilding all my setups to B2B. While I was rebuilding nozzles, not all the 42mm long tubes would seat fully in the nozzle.
    If the 4mm tube was already in place in the tube-nut when you set the clip in place, this could force the nozzle out the end.

    What to do if a tube does not fully seat in the nozzle:
    Clean it out! Simple enough, right? I drill mine out by hand with a 3mm twist drill. It is marked for depth so I don't cut any aluminum.
    This also cleans out the muck they used to hold nozzles in place while installing the housing.
    I also do the periodic maintenance of clearing out the aperture by running a wire through backwards.

    However, this is an alternative to makng sur ethe tube isn't blocked by cold plastics:
    The idea of the snug fit of the tube in the core is to help make sure it is properly installed.
    Use -only- the tube-nut when setting the level of the core in the housing. No tube!
    This way, the 42mm long tube can move if it needs to.
    Once the keeper is installed, you can remove the tube-nut.
    Take a look at where the 42mm long tube is. Is it still seated at the bottom of the socket for the 4mm tube?
    If so, you are good to go.
    However, more often than not, it won't be if you don't clean your nozzles first.
    We can use the printer to fix this;
    Put the nozzle housing assembly in the printer. Just the housing, nozzle, spring, core, 42mm long tubing, and clip.
    Put in a cartridge.
    Run the test print... when print head moves to the plate, cancel twice...
    Then push a piece of 4mm tubing into the core's socket to "seat" the 42mm long tube.
    Once seated, you can load the filament by connecting a bowden tube as previously discussed.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 07-16-2018 at 12:20 AM.

  6. #26
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    Printed a good 10 hours or so with the original filament with this setup without anything keeping the tubes in on either end of the nuts and no slipping or problems at all.
    Filament eventually ran out and switched over to third party filament and the need for the circlets finally becomes clear, it prints fine but sooner rather than later:

    BowdenSlip.jpg

    Solution 1: I finally give in and faff about trying to make the circlets by getting creative with a dremel/drill and the new tubing to make a circlip
    Solution 2: I print the groove cutter set and buy an eyeglass screwdriver thingy
    Solution 3: I get creative with tinkercad and merge your m6 thread from the hot end tubnet onto the bulkhead tubenut and use a push fit connector until I fancy attempting solution 2 when I have more time available.

    Solution 3 is looking like the easiest option in the short term.

  7. #27
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    Wow! all I can say is "WOW"!

    I will have to try to simplify the grooving tool.

    Realizing the cutting blade can be made with a bike spoke opens up a few possibilities.

    So dumb question... if you don't have a lathe, how were you going to try to make a nozzle?

    You are aware that the previous M6 option posting includes both ends modified for M6, right?
    Bottom of the post...
    http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...ll=1#post44567
    Last edited by TommyDee; 07-17-2018 at 06:51 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    Wow! all I can say is "WOW"!

    I will have to try to simplify the grooving tool.

    Realizing the cutting blade can be made with a bike spoke opens up a few possibilities.
    The amount of plastic and parts put me off attempting the solution. I'm in a rush to build a lack enclosure and replacement desk at the moment and needed some brackets etc like yesterday.

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    So dumb question... if you don't have a lathe, how were you going to try to make a nozzle?
    Dremel off the section of the refil carts to match the length of the printing nozzle, hope it's the same width, swear that it's not, use a vice/modified dremel 3000 to turn it into a make shift drill press. Thread a nut onto the end of it with a tap and dye set to make the circle part....Didn't say it was a well thought out plan

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post

    You are aware that the previous M6 option posting includes both ends modified for M6, right?
    Bottom of the post...
    http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...ll=1#post44567
    Turns out I went with the hidden option 4:

    Option 4: Swear I've made a Frankenstein'd monstrosity that seems to do the job and wish I'd printed: http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...ll=1#post44567

  9. #29
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    Okay, I needed a good laugh Carry on!

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Loose a nozzle housing spring?
    Find a ball point pen spring that fits...

    penspring.PNG

    - - - - - - - - - -

    For some reason I have a lot of trouble finding things on the forum after a short period of time.
    There are a lot of fragmented projects here that I am trying to consolidate in Thingiverse.

    One part of this project that should be easily found is this adapter to earlier efforts.

    If you went through the efforts to make this hub adapter, I've also made an adapter for this B2B effort.
    This requires a 57mm length of 4mm tubing in this housing to make the smooth transition.

    (crap, now Chrome won't let me go -advanced-) back to IE11...

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Ha, now I found it... the PC4-M5 thread is my placeholder...
    http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...ll=1#post44506

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Alright; let's proceed with the B2B cartridge spool install video...



    - - - - - - - - - -

    Thought this might be interesting for merging different colors...
    A means to break the bowden tube in the middle somewhere.

    b2bsplice.PNG

    B2B Splice

    - - - - - - - - - -

    c1.PNG

    This should be fun....

    - - - - - - - - - -

    The splice already has the sidewalks. I printed a pair on opposite sides of the plate using ABS and they came out very nice.

    The plug in the bore just pushes out. This is a support for the split ring shoulder.

    I should see if I can use this is an alternative location for changing filament (hot-pull). If it gets stuck, it is a lot easier to fix on the fly.

    The concept behind the splice is to maintain alignment between the tubes. This should allow you to selectively "stock" the tube with short segments of different colors. If it doesn't catch and rip the 42mm long tube in the nozzle housing, life is good!

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Okay, the splice is a hit on one count and a miss on another.

    No matter what, removing the cartridge for filament changes is required.
    This is just a fact of life until you go through the trouble to hack a jog-driver to the motor as a service mode.

    Fortunately, that isn't a problem. I found out the Cartridge saver doubles as a push-button cartridge release.

    I was re-using a white PLA filament to push 1/2 meter segments of filament preloaded in the bowden tube.
    Remember I was running cooling towers so this is the result...

    d1.PNG

    I'm ecstatic! This has been my goal for a long time. The ability to reliably and easily change filament at the tip.
    So I tried my bowden path torture test. I ran a pigtail B2B tube with the splice just to have a little extra length on the bowden tube.
    This tube I preloaded with about 5 or 6 ~3" chunks of different colors of PLA.
    "Rewound" the white pusher filament in the cartridge and started the print. The bowden tube held about 12 minutes worth of PLA before the pusher stock would reach the nozzle. The attempt here is to make sure the pusher stock does not run into the nozzle. The nozzle is always primed this way. However, a pull of the filament while hot from the nozzle of the previous color can get you a fairly precise color change mid-print.

    d2.PNG

    And for the big question; Did the 42mm tube survive? Didn't even look phased!

    d3.PNG

    The splice isn't necessary for filament changes. The disconnect at the bulkhead is more than useful for this "merging" process.
    But I will say that having the small pigtail attached to the nozzle housing for a filament pull is working perfectly.
    Adding the pigtail just adds to the "no-touch" nozzle. It is more part of the machine rather than part of the cartridge or a dongle device.

    This system just rocks!

    Coming up... a simpler grooving tool.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    Last edited by TommyDee; Today at 05:23 AM.

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