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  1. #11
    Regular 3D Printer
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    I cleaned it out using a Q-tip. I took off the fluffy cotton, and was able to warm the tip up with a lighter and push out whatever was in there. It worked well, however I am just going to throw out the filament. I've come to conclude that maybe it was the filament. I've had it for over a year, but I just am tired of trying to figure it out..

    - - - - - - - - - -

    You know what... I had noticed that the teflon wasn't reaching that far into the metal tip. I am going to have to cut a longer peice and try to make it stick further inside.

  2. #12
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Two observations for you MM;

    1; When 3DS manufacturers cartridges, specifically the nozzle, they've used "Goo" of many flavors. Some is black, some is cream colored, I've even seen a hot pink... but that may be the cream colored stuff with PLA creepage. This gunk needs to be cleaned out. I use a 3mm drill bit and a couple of drill chucks to -carefully- clean the tube all the way to the aluminum nozzle. I have a small silver dot on the drill bit to know where the bottom of the nozzle is (you'll feel it). This is not present in all cartridges. You'll know when you pull the tube and it has mildly sticky stuff that wipes off. I assume this was used to minimize the nozzle shooting spree in the factory that would happened trying to assembly the nozzle housings without some level of restrictive force. Don't let this gunk get into the tip! That may be the black blobs I remove from time to time.

    2; One common failure in early cartridges occurred when the barrel nut in the nozzle housing was not threaded up far enough. Same as the previous post; they left 2mm of clearance which simply won't work on some assemblies. So of course, like an idiot, I thread the nut on a little further. This now creates a new bottleneck. I no longer run any barrel nuts in the feed system. They can be used if you understand the limitations of PTFE. This is often from push-nuts that would not let the nozzle seat fully in heater body. So when you solved the seating problem, you also added additional gap. It is a no-win situation. Awareness is probably the only thing anyone could ask for to make the best interface possible. This is still my most robust nozzle solution if you have the tools or patience: https://openbuilds.com/builds/3ds-cu...extruder.4734/


    The depth of the stainless tube is exactly 22mm.
    Here's how I know...

    tip.PNG
    Last edited by TommyDee; 06-15-2018 at 01:39 AM.

  3. #13
    3D Printer Noob
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    Feb 2018
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    tommy a question, does the cube 3 support work well? is that I did a test and they came out pretty bad

  4. #14
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    I have not found a good use for Cube Print 4.03 supports.
    Normally they are too dense.

    I use MeshMixer to create supports or I design them in the CAD software.
    There is no easy way to make anything print.

  5. #15
    3D Printer Noob
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    What is the configuration you use to put the supports?
    what of angle thresh, contact tol, etc
    Last edited by slx612; 06-17-2018 at 05:59 PM.

  6. #16
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    I still haven't found a universal setting.
    But do know that you can make your own supports within the dialog.

    The Cube 3 is overhang-tolerant to about 45 degrees, and depending on the geometry, could be more.
    2mm tip height x 0.5mm or less contact.
    Post diameters of 2mm is sufficient, 2.4 is a little more stable.
    Make the pads at least 10mm.
    If I understand contact tolerance correctly, you do want an offset of at least 0.5mm, 1 is better, between the print and the supports.

    You can also force the entire model to float above the build plate with support. It is one of the other offset values.

  7. #17
    3D Printer Noob
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    thank you very much

  8. #18
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Anytime

  9. #19
    Regular 3D Printer
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    I purchased an entire new cartridge... and I'm still getting gaps and holes... =/

    I'm at a loss.. I feel like trashing the printer... I've wasted so many hours on this thing...

  10. #20
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    This is not normal MM.

    You're an old salt on the EE side, right?
    What do we do when something just inexplicably quits?




    ...
    ..
    .
    We take it apart and re-seat everything!
    And we make sure the magic smoke didn't come out of the devices by sniffing everything.

    Okay, maybe limiting it to the power and heating circuits, but yes, your situation, along with the temp errors is not the norm.
    A new cartridge at least should have given it a better go even if factory maligned.


    The only other place to go is insufficient feed, but I don't know what could have changed that.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    I forgot about the young punk in IT... "DID YOU RELOAD YOUR OS, DOODE!"

    Which in this case may not hurt. Maybe your "feed" lost a digit, or decade.
    Reload the modified F/W.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    HK... you still monitoring here?

    I just got some serious junk natural clear ABS from 3D Solutech.
    That wouldn't be the filament you are running is it?

 

 

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