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  1. #21
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    Technically, you can buy PC4-M5 and PC4-M6 fittings. The PC is the tube OD and the M is the thread. I use to design for both but settled on M5. There shouldn't be a problem making an M6 version of both parts. I use to get my fitting from China and they were junk (probably rejected parts). I'm going to suggest the ones you purchased are up to the task and properly spec'd. I'll see if I can add the M6 versions this weekend.

  2. #22
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    That would be amazing. I’ll give your b2b thing a go, hopefully one of my two unopened abs cartridges comes out on the good side of 50%.

    I looked up cooling towers on thingverse and found one I can use and shove off to the side on smaller prints. Major facepalm moment, they’re so simple and would have helped with my printing to date.

    Thank you for your time so far with this thread, I really appreciate the help.

  3. #23
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    I am happy to help. You will find an M6 bulkhead in the files: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3221010/files That one I already had available just not posted.

    35mm tall and wide cooling tower: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GpS...ew?usp=sharing

    - - - - - - - - - -

    You enjoy your day on the other side of the world. Time for me to count sheep!

  4. #24
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    Ive done all 3 of the hubs, the hubcap is the most bulkiest but the wings seem to break a lot, just started using the B2B and thus far no issues. My favorite is a version of the KISS one that TD modified. That has performed flawlessly and have had just 1 small issue that was quickly remedied.

  5. #25
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    Morning all,

    So I've had a read of this thread from start to finish and a few other ones to boot. It definitely seems that the KISS method is the best one to aim for - I don't have the tools to perform surgery on a cartridge but I am sure I can bribe someone to do it for me when I'm back in the city; until then I can swap the KISS stuff between the 3DS cartridges I already have full or partially full. As I've got the parts already I would prefer to aim for the version that uses the push fittings for now, that and I won't need to worry about the grooving tool for now - I am sure I'll eventually upgrade to the full B2B method, I won't be able to stop myself tinkering.

    I'm going to regurgitate so of your posts here to make sure I have it straight in my head (and I have the URLs in one place for reference), so bear with me please

    Hotend
    This is the hotend I will need, but it currently does not fit an M6 push fitting for a 4mm OD tube.

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2591654

    I will either need to find & buy a M5 push fitting for a 4mm OD tube when I return to the city in two weeks, or bribe Tommy to mod it so it'll work with what I have got. Would I be right in assuming the only part that would need to be altered for a M6 thread is the part it actually screws into?

    Also on the photos, what is the aggressive nut adjustment? Does that mean some alteration to the stock metal hotend component is required?

    Bulkhead
    On the other end of the tube I will need the one Tommy linked with the M6 version above (thanks for upping that so quickly)
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3221010/files

  6. #26
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    You got it Crucias. I'm not hard to bribe... just a post letting me know it worked. Most likely the tube will be a little longer than 42mm so don't cut that yet. The housing should remain the same. We're talking about the core being modified. And yes, I will do that in the next couple of days. I have every interest in knowing if this works too not having proper M6 fittings.

    I love it when a person actually reads information. Hats off to you Crucias! Yes, we have been moving the push-nut closer to the top of the nozzle to ensure it seats fully in the heater block. If you happened to retract it a little too far, no worries because it will settle where it should. There is a tool that Don designed for us somewhere and I need to find it. If not, I have the original and I'll get that up on my Google drive. Anyway, we are pushing the push-nut (that flange looking thing) to about 1/8" from the end.

    I'll find that tool and get back to you. Aha... a little out of place but here it is: http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...Color-Printing
    Last edited by TommyDee; 09-28-2019 at 02:43 AM.

  7. #27
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    Appreciate the time you're spending modding that file Tommy

    From my understanding of your response and that thread I won't need to worry about that adjustment thing since I only use one extruder at a time? I haven't bothered with dual colours or anything

  8. #28
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    Yea, that balancing thing was more of a red herring. Dual color printing on Cube3 is a pain to set up perfectly. But with segregated nozzles, we can eventually match up a pair. Worst case, we dig into moving the print head. Normally you could do that with plate leveling but we have a calibrated level that we must maintain. Bottom line, it is always best to know your nozzle is fully seated in the heater block for stability, proper heating, and consistent gap. The tool should probably be printed with PLA as ABS might make for a bit of tight fit. PLA is tougher too for this type of operation.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    fatfoot.PNG
    threads.PNG

    Technically this is only 4.5mm longer but it comes with a caveat; it is likely that the 2.8mm stock tube will fit into the small hole of the fitting. That means you need to figure out the right length if this is the case. Basically, to the bottom of the 4mm tube. You do not want the 4mm tube pushing on the 2.8mm tube... just keep it in place. That is what the M5 fitting does.

    The center bore will be a bit tight. I recommend finding a .111" (#34) drill-bit for places where the tube wants to be 'snug' which includes the bulkhead. Snug keeps the tube from working back and forth when the retractions happened.

    Here's the math... in M5 thread, the tube is inserted in the core 20.8mm (~21mm). The tube is normally 42mm therefore half the tube is inside the core and half outside (protrusion into the nozzle). So whatever you end up with for additional length when the 4mm tube is fully seated in the fitting, it is 21mm below the other end of this core.

    This one is made of 3DS ABS and took 51 minutes.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. Thanks CruciasNZ thanked for this post
  10. #29
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    So I need to be careful to trim the stock tubing that I am retaining within the hotend so that it abuts the new tubing coming through the M/6 fitting, but not enough that it tries to ride up inside the new tubing?

    Also wasn't expecting such a fast turn around on the redesign, I'm starting to run out of phrases that express gratitude.

    Just found out my printer is being evicted from its room (how rude!) by family unexpectedly returning from overseas early on Wednesday, so here's hoping I can blitz it between now and then (otherwise it''ll have to wait till I return to Christchurch next week, currently pet sitting down near Queenstown)

  11. #30
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    Yea, I could see that being an issue Hey, I ran across the files so I gave it a go. I can never get the perfect ID to print. It will be tight until you ream it with something. Never a lot of plastic coming out, just getting it 'aligned'. Also, you can salvage much of that stock tubing. Teflon has a weird property; elastic memory. Find yourself a junk bicycle spoke and see if it is not 2mm. Cut the threads off and grind the end a bit and you have a tool to work the tube to restore its original shape. I use one of these cores to smooth over the tube and it takes all the wrinkles out. Okay, most of them. Very useful for the 99mm piece of tube required for the case from the driver to the bulkhead.

    I can tell you though... getting through this stuff is never fast. There are so many nuances to this little marvel
    But I can tell you this with all honesty, I am very glad I started with the Cube3 and kept at it. When I had the choice, I even went with the CubePro. My need is quite technical, and these two printers can do just fine with a little foreknowledge.

 

 

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