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  1. #111
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    I was a bit surprised to see how far up the tube the bulges were begin pulled during retraction, I'm getting a good 1 CM of bulge with ~ 2-3mm of tube free below it - given the tube doesn't go all the way down into the nozzle, that implies the printer is doing almost an inch of retraction. Now my numbers will be off since I am Mk1 eyeballing it and applying a hazy memory filter, but should give you the picture.

    I'll have a look at the editor tonight if I get time then. All I've done so far is replace temperatures with it, not fiddled with other settings. I'll be stoked if all I need to do is fiddle with retraction settings.

    The massive prints are unavoidable for me because some of the items I am printing take up the whole print place. Parts of a 3D printed blood bowl pitch. I'll look into getting a drill and vice contraption, plus some acupuncture needles, next month based on Tommy's post on nozzle maintenance. Every little bit helps

  2. #112
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    Every little bit helps indeed ;p

    There are several posts on retraction and how you can manipulate that as well. Buddy really went out of his way to make this available. You can set values to 2/3rd original and you'll see a difference.

  3. #113
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    Alright so that pane of the editor is not as simple to use. Will put my request for explanation in the appropriate thread so the answer is more readily apparent to others.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Looks like the tips on the retraction were the golden ticket. Was able to complete one of the prints that was giving me issues

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Damn. Blocked again. Previously the length of blockage was closer to 10mm, but with reducing the retraction by 1/3 the length is 4mm. In realized i could insert the end of the filament with the bump a shorter distance into the nozzle than an unmelted end, so heated the nozzle, manually rammed filament into it until stuff came out the nozzle, then yanked it back and pulled out what appears to be a chunk of filament that was inside the narrower part of the nozzle (Edit: see photo). I can now insert the slightly melted tip of the blocked filament a significant distance more than before. This has got me wondering if my filament is building up inside the nozzle because the temperatures are too low, eventually leading to a blockage.

    Any ideas if increase temperature from 215 to 220, and / or decreasing retraction even further would help? Recommended print temp for this filament was 190 to 230, so I am wondering if going hotter would prevent it blocking during retraction as the nozzle could travel further during a retraction before the filament cools enough to block.

    IMG_0937.jpg
    Last edited by CruciasNZ; 02-23-2020 at 01:01 AM.

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  5. #114
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    This is a recipe development question. Each filament has a sweet spot. I rarely take the time to find that sweet spot. I use 3DS ABS because the slicer is optimized for it, and it alone. From what I know, too little retraction means stringing; too much heat is plosives (pops from entrapped air from retraction). Reduced retraction will allow for more heat allowance. Going 220C isn't outrageous.

  6. #115
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    I'm already seeing a bit of stringing in my prints at 215C and 300 retraction, but it's fine enough a quick rub with a thumb cleans it right up. I'll try iterating 220, 225, 230 and increasing retraction slightly at each stage. I guess I'll eventually find that sweet spot, at which point I will stockpile this filament so I don't have to repeat the experiments for ages xD

    Thanks for your ongoing comments.

  7. #116
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    My pleasure Crucias. I never much liked recipe development in any discipline. That was a huge part of the Cube's appeal.

    BTW; that image of the pull from the nozzle - that looks a lot like my 3D Solutech. Stringy and glassy. That is what 'glazes' the output end of the 42mm length of tube. 3DS filament doesn't do that. Instead, 3DS has a 'lubricant' that oozes past the tube and gunks up the stainless tubing. I was using another maker I really liked, no residues, and bam! - they're out of business. So yes, find your maker and stick with them. I like 3D Sulutech but it does require a little more maintenance. I'm about to try another brand with some coppery stuff.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 02-24-2020 at 12:18 AM.

  8. #117
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    Interesting observation.

    The maintenance you refer to, is that your drilling out the nozzle & acupuncturing the tip (and shoving the bike spoke through the tubing) routine I've read elsewhere? I'm thinking I'll disassemble my nozzle after every one of my upcoming prints and just ream out the inserted ptfe tubing. Got a lot of 6 hour and 13 hour prints to do in order to finish my blood bowl pitch. Want to give it every chance of success. This is after I find a way to stop my jams on the first print mind you

  9. #118
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    The bike spoke is just a qualification tool. The reaming of the stainless tube is only needed is you have bleed; and yes on the acupuncture thing. That draws out contaminants at the nozzle aperture.

    Yes, 13 hour prints for sure do a simple maintenance to clear the tip and the tube. 3-4 hour is less risky. 6-8 hour - weigh the risk.

    Nice thing is that it comes apart with minimal effort.

  10. #119
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    Even at 220C, reduced retraction, and reaming of the nozzle between prints I am still having poor luck with this filament. I really don't want to change and have to go through this process again, but I guess it's either than or buy another type of 3D printer *insert swearing here*

    Any words of wisdom for picking a filament out of a range of options? Special keywords or higher price or something?

  11. #120
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    Nope; cheaper is simpler and probably better. I've had great luck with PenPacks - typically very forgiving filaments for the 3D pens in a variety of colors. I like 3D Solutech but it does have a similar artifact. It varies between spools or colors. It makes for tougher prints. And I like their opacity.

 

 

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