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  1. #91
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    You boys been busy!

    What you are seeing is some housekeeping information. Indeed there is a first layer temp of 235C and a normal running temp of 210C in the PLA listings above.
    I am pretty sure the bias temperature for the unused nozzle is 245C. this is what keeps the heater block warm.

    And I really don't like the 260C on PLA prints. I normally bring that back down to 245C or so.

    The 145C and 155C are part of bias temps. It does a strange little dance when it switches nozzles. Same with the 225C and 235C. They are a way to help avoid overshoots.

    Adding 5 degrees to a simple print can be done by simply changing the 210 to 215 on the left side and leave all else the same.

    I did challenge Mythandar how he implemented the temps before I could see the print files. He wasn't very forthcoming.
    I much prefer Buddy's most excellent visualizer and condenser. This is how I was able to see what the machine was doing.
    Buddy's consolidation menu is a great way to analyse how the slicer thinks for the various materials.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 02-05-2020 at 11:44 PM.

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  3. #92
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    Right so my skill ring (the first screenshot i posted) has 2 counts of 205, and 25 of 200.

    Should I:


    1. Increase both to 210, or
    2. the 205 to 210 and the 200 to 205?

  4. #93
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    200C was the original value for the 44 instances? Never seen that. I'm going to suggest going to 215C for the majority of the calls. Leave 145 and 155 alone. Leave 225 and 235 alone. Leave all right side extruders alone unless you want to reduce the 260C.

    Can you link me to the original print file and the original STL? I'd like to take a quick look.

  5. #94
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    Here ya go

    Also need to work out a way to get the PLA that got on the walls of the nozzle housing out. I was going to buy a tube brush but the only 3mm diameter ones I can find are nylon, which unfortunately liquidizes at similar temps to PLA. I'm thinking I might run a purge cycle with the ABS nozzle in, and remove it as the blocks start heating. find some metal utensil I can shove down the hole and massage the sides while its hot

  6. #95
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    Don't over-temp the glassy stuff. I do know what that is and you don't want to burn it in the aperture. That is what makes for carbon poisoning a tip.

    Interesting file to digest... um analyse. Indeed they backed off the temps for 0.07mm prints. But they backed off to 205C. The 200C calls are during the end of the print when things slow down and it goes into a different 'zone'. It is managing the temp of the print. And it is lousy at it. So not a lot of filament going out at 200C in the print file. 205C only had to be called out once for the majority of the print, so yes, 215C is not a bad place to go with PLA that leaves behind a glossy filler. I've gotten that with some of the 3D Solutech filament. I push a bike spoke through it [threads removed] to get it out. It is not overly stuck. Nothing sticks to Teflon.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Glad you are looking at these files Crucias. I had to look at the raw BFB file to find the M104 calls to set temperature. There is a P0 or P1 on the M104 calls to signify of it has to wait for to reach temp or not. Keep that in mind. Otherwise, feel free to rummage through the file. Buddy's done an amazing job of managing the print file while all the hard work has become transparent to us.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    I'm done editing now

  7. #96
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    Alright I will change the 205 to 215 next time I have a go at printing. Got to solve the jam in the holes first, my attempt to insert the new nozzle setup pushed the core up and out of the hotend replacement.

    Hmm yeah definitely don't want noxious fumes so will have to come up with a different tactic for cleaning the heater & nozzle aperture. Have you got a cleaning strategy for cleaning inside the holes the hotend gets inserted to?

  8. #97
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    A couple of them yes.

    The nut of the bowden tube is suppose to stop or pushes back the core. Basically the push nut will self-adjust. It has nowhere to go.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    This is how I clean out the leaching goo: http://www.print3dforum.com/showthre...ll=1#post46942

    The aperture I send a copper wire back through from the exit side of the hole. With a torch type lighter, I carefully heat the tip while holding the push nut. I try to feed the copper wire until it gets warm enough to start going into the hole. This helps the plastic stick to the wire as you push, then pull the wire it all the way through. It does take finesse.

    I did get some stainless pointy things to do this but they can't go through. Makes them a little less useful. The wire needs to be less than 0.035mm. I think our apertures are 0.04mm. You can usually find fine copper strands in power cords or the like from a salvage pile. It has to be rigid enough to hold up to pushing it into the warm plastic.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 02-06-2020 at 01:54 AM.

  9. #98
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    Aye I can see why that would be a practical solution for clearing the nozzle.

    Outstanding Issue 1

    The nozzles will not insert into the black heater block without significant force, and removing them requires significant force. Removing the ABS cartridge actually pulled the nozzle out of the hotend and away from its push nut which made me do a double take.

    I believe this has been caused by my noticing the push nut sliding down the nozzle and printing with the nozzle barely sticking through the bottom of the heater block. This has allowed PLA up inside the nozzle aperture and tightened the aperture in the same way that my PLA was constricting the PTFE tubing. I need to clean this somehow, and had thought to heat it and scrape it through a purge cycle with no nozzle inserted.

    Outstanding Issue 2
    I am getting variable grip on the central core from the U shaped push clip. It is enough to hold it during printing, but not enough to allow me to force the nozzle through the tightened apertures caused by Issue 1. I am thinking I will re-print the central core but increase its size by 1%, then file it down to fit when force is applied to insert it into the replacement hotend.

  10. #99
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    Bamboo skewers are your friend. I always heat up the nozzles when pulling a nozzle. Most often it sticks at the black cover. I like the tight seal the nozzle has with the cover. When that fails, I don't know what happens. But I know the drool-factor that deposits plastic in the heater block. That is what bamboo skewers are for. Heat it up on a 'test print' procedure and remove the nozzle and proceed with clearing out the contaminants. You might get errors if the nozzle is not engaged for heat-up.

    It takes very little for a printer to alter my initial intent with the nozzle housing, core, and bowden nut interface. The core needs to be free to the point where the spring is functional. Some sandpaper on a tube makes quick work of blobs or ridges.

    The clip is meant to be filament. When in use, it is relaxed by the bowden nut. That is the right way to in stall the clip - install the bowden nut and then install the clip. Fun fact, the holes for the clips should come out to 2mm ID. Perfect chase tool is a bicycle spoke. Making these holes too big also adds clearance for the core to miss the clip entirely. It is a very tacit hold if the core is rotated to an indent at the clip. But they can't fail during a print because they are not in use; the bowden tube nut is what is keeping the stack together. Same with a fully seated nozzle; the bottom housing flange doesn't see the spring tension because the nozzle actuates the spring when seated properly. All bets are off when you remove the nozzle. If the flange is hot it could be a problem with the spring - allow time to cool before removing. You remove the bowden nut and the full spring tension is on the core. Never had a clip fail to hold the core in place while idle in the box.

    Maybe it helps a bit to understand the design philosophy and how your nozzle should be behaving. Mine behave very well
    Last edited by TommyDee; 02-06-2020 at 03:00 AM.

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  12. #100
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    Legend - pretty sure I've got bamboo kebab skewers downstairs somewhere

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    It takes very little for a printer to alter my initial intent with the nozzle housing, core, and bowden nut interface. The core needs to be free to the point where the spring is functional. Some sandpaper on a tube makes quick work of blobs or ridges.

    The clip is meant to be filament. When in use, it is relaxed by the bowden nut. That is the right way to in stall the clip - install the bowden nut and then install the clip. Fun fact, the holes for the clips should come out to 2mm ID. Perfect chase tool is a bicycle spoke. Making these holes too big also adds clearance for the core to miss the clip entirely. It is a very tacit hold if the core is rotated to an indent at the clip. But they can't fail during a print because they are not in use; the bowden tube nut is what is keeping the stack together. Same with a fully seated nozzle; the bottom housing flange doesn't see the spring tension because the nozzle actuates the spring when seated properly. All bets are off when you remove the nozzle. If the flange is hot it could be a problem with the spring - allow time to cool before removing. You remove the bowden nut and the full spring tension is on the core. Never had a clip fail to hold the core in place while idle in the box.

    Maybe it helps a bit to understand the design philosophy and how your nozzle should be behaving. Mine behave very well
    My setup is below, and to me looks similar to the pictures in the thingiverse page. Note that the spring is usually wedged into a 2-3mm gap once fully assumbled, the nozzle doesn't have filament locking it in place at the time of picture.

    I believe that once I resolve my constriction problem in the housing and stop the jams the ABS U-Clips will be sufficient to hold it together during insertion. They were before, though not all clips are equal - some grip is required to insert the nozzles, and come clips are just a bit too narrow on the prongs to function. I've taking to bulk printing them and discarding the ones that don't work properly.

    Going to have a go at clearing the constructions with the skewers on Saturday. Seems like a good Saturday morning task.

    IMG_0901.jpg
    IMG_0902.jpg

 

 

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