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  1. #1
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    Problems with 3D printed box's walls.

    Hi all!

    I am looking for some advise from you, experienced Cube3 users, to solve a problem that I have with my first design to be printed with my new machine.

    I designed a little box in AutoCAD and then exported it as STL to be printed with the Cube3. The design has two parts that are solid objects.
    I verified that editing the part with Meshmixer and MeshLab, but I have not found any problems in the design itself.

    When the walls of the objects are being printed the machine seems to follow a path along each side of the walls that are not fixed together making separated parallel walls... ???

    These walls are 1 mm thick except for the taller one that will fit in the other side of the box that is 0.8 mm thick. The box is 55.3 mm x 83.7 mm.

    Any idea about what might be happening with this?

    All suggestions will be greatly appreciated!
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  2. #2
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    Stiches. Drill small holes in the print to get it to stick to the layer next to it.

    There is little you can do to force side-adhesion. I use 0.9mm which walls in designs as that helps a lot. But I do add pinholes if I need the slicer to stich the walls together when needed. You could try increasing the extrusion pressure with buddybu's tools but I don't think that will work out in the long run as bridging will fail as will delicate features.

    I use the 0.9 and 1.8mm references dear to me when designing. This is part of forcing the slicer to do my bidding. Kind of like teaching a dog - it teaches you in the end.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    What filament is that? It looks great on the Cube3!

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  4. #3
    Regular 3D Printer
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    Sometimes it also helps if you simple change the slicer to "almost solid" as it will do more loops an that sometimes causes also filling the gab... besides that. Follow TommyDees suggestion on the reference values 0.9 and 1.8mm. that helps also ��

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  6. #4
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    I can understand what you are telling me TonnyDee, but actually these are not separate walls that I want to afix together.
    These walls are created by the extrusor passing in parallel paths. I can not see why the plastic sticks to the bottom layer but do not do that to the side of them. Perhaps there is a compromise with the quantity of paths that fit a distance between them so, I think that your suggestion of changing the measure to 0.9 instead of 1 mm makes sense.

    I was observing the cooling towers that you included with some parts in the Universal Hub project. They are constructed by two path and are perfectly fused together.
    I measured these walls and they are 0.93 to 0.97 mm thick, so a thought that 1 mm will work for my box.

    I am attaching some pictures to show you these parts and the traces that are visible on the surface of the border. I also did a cut of the box design to show you the measures of the walls of these pieces.

    Regarding the filament that I am using, I think that it is made here, in Argentina. I do not know if the raw material is imported or produced here too. The brand is Hellbot and it is the more expensive one among what they have in the shop. The color is orange (Naranja in Spanish).
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  7. #5
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    It gets a little technical Leonardo. I can try to explain as the slicer acts;
    The slicer determines how many traces make up a wall. 1mm wall is two traces/passes. This is 1/4mm to either side of the extruder path. Each trace comes up a little short on width. The next trace is lain down and the previous trace is already cool.
    What I do by forcing the physical model wall to be 0.9mm is that I now have an overlap in the traces. The two paths are crowded closer together. The setback from the outside edge is still 1/4mm but the clearance between traces is now 0.4mm instead of 0.5mm. This closes the two traces up a little bit.
    In the case of the PLA cylinders, they are not actually round in code. They make straight little vectors. The points on these vectors are sufficient to weld the tubular prints together some while the straight runs don't. They just peel apart.

    You will also find that ABS in a cylinder does not fuse haphazardly as the PLA does. I can make perfectly clean sheets of ABS by cutting the seam.

    My 0.9 and 1.8 thick wall in design (not print-walls) help make prints more solid. As the extruder still puts out the same material, the actual thickness will be more than he 0.9mm due to the crowding as explained earlier.

    If this doesn't make sense yet, I may need to resort to examples. You can actually see this in CubePro with a few tricks.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    As to your numbers, 0.5mm is too thin for this filament printer. 1.1+0.5 should be 0.9+0.9 to get what you will get from the printer.
    truncate the radii at the bottom. This will make a cleaner edge. Make the lead-in angle of the radius 45 degrees or better.

    Part of what I do with those numbers is to make sure I have 4-traces consistently for strength. That means the minimum thickness anywhere is 1.8mm horizontally.

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  9. #6
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    Thank you very much TommyDee!

    I will redesign the box taking in account all your suggestions and will print it so see what happen. I think that it will works.

    Have a nice weekend!

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  11. #7
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    Take a look at the sidewalls of this model Leonardo - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3250065
    That is the stitching I was referring to. One or two along long length will help if the esthetics are okay with it.
    I've done these stitches blind within a structure as well to add strength.

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  13. #8
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    I liked the battery holder! I will 3d print it to see the stitching in hand.
    Thank you so much again!

 

 

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