Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    3D Printer Legend
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    712
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by lawong View Post
    Is that a permanent solution? Glass don't stay bent like metal........
    @ lawong - He's doing it to the aluminium bed, before he puts the glass on

  2. #12
    Regular 3D Printer
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    116
    Post Thanks / Like
    Ah I see my bad...

    I don't think you need to bend the bed to fit the glass, never had a problem with that.

    Just take off the Kapton from the heat bed for a closer contact but use clips to hold them in place so that you can swap out the plates quickly.

  3. #13
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    2,764
    Post Thanks / Like
    Having the glass resting on a flat surface once it heats up is much safer than a "mountain" like surface, thats for sure...

  4. #14
    Expert 3D Printer
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    304
    Post Thanks / Like
    I don't believe that the 3mm sheet of glass would have enough elasticity resistance to make the underlying aluminium to get flat again.
    Thats why I want to 'fix' the aluminium bed before applying the glass.

    Maybe if I 'fix' the aluminium I don't need the glass anymore? Hmmm something to consider.

  5. #15
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    2,764
    Post Thanks / Like
    You would eventually comb it again, since the pressure applied by the four screws during continuous heated sessions will make the metal bend again...

  6. #16
    3D Printer Legend
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    712
    Post Thanks / Like
    @Joao - Could I please ask for your electrical advice as my skills are very poor? (sorry for borrowing this thread for a moment)
    My heated bed has stopped working and I am trying to avoid sending it back to China again until I'm sure it's a major problem that I cannot solve here. What simple tests can I do to check basic facts e.g. My extruder heater is working so if I plug the heater connector into the bed socket, is that safe? is there enough power to heat the bed? I really need to get this sorted soon as I have stuff to print for my grandsons birthday.

  7. #17
    Expert 3D Printer
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    304
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BobenhamHotspur View Post
    @Joao - Could I please ask for your electrical advice as my skills are very poor? (sorry for borrowing this thread for a moment)
    My heated bed has stopped working and I am trying to avoid sending it back to China again until I'm sure it's a major problem that I cannot solve here. What simple tests can I do to check basic facts e.g. My extruder heater is working so if I plug the heater connector into the bed socket, is that safe? is there enough power to heat the bed? I really need to get this sorted soon as I have stuff to print for my grandsons birthday.
    Hi Bob,
    I would suggest you to buy a multimeter first
    Even the cheap ones for 5 would help you a lot for any the electrical DIY.

    You can swap the bed socket with the extruder, since the board circuit does not make any difference to which heat element it's giving power.
    There are even 2 spares ones for additional heating elements (more extruders?) .
    If you get the bed's relay burnt you could at least use a spare one and change the software settings. But lets find out first where the problem is and then act on it.

    Another alternative to test (without the multimeter) you could wire any 12V light bulb that you might have at home.

    I found that many people makes confusion with voltage (V) and power (Watt).
    For example you can connect any 12V light bulb that consumes 1W to a power supply that says it is 12V 300W (12V 25A).
    This means that the bulb will use 1W from the available 300W. Its not that the power supply will force the light bulb to take that amount of wattages/amperes. Its always the other way around, you just need to make sure that the supplier can take provide more than the total of its consumers.
    Since the bed has a very high consumption, it is perfectly safe to test almost any small 12V device with a low W or Amp.

    Feel free to start another thread to discuss and identify your printer problem.
    I am happy to assist.

  8. #18
    Regular 3D Printer
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like
    So examining my bed with an engineers square it seems there's a significant but predictable rise and fall from left to right (X axis) and a similar but not so significant rise back to front (Y). It makes me think that (as noted above) that any attempt to flatten (which would be very hard to do) would probably be undone whenever the aluminum goes through a heat cycle since the heater is centered on the X and on one side (underside). I know it seems to conduct the heat around pretty quickly but it's a thin piece still. Since it's gradual and even bend won't a piece of glass clipped on the low edges just make the glass bend and conform the same shape? You could pad the corners where the glass is clipped if you knew the heat transfer would still take place evenly. Or do you use pretty thick glass?

    A couple of ideas;
    4 or 6mm sheet of a less expansive alloy (not 6061-T6 which is what it looks like)? Might take a few minutes longer to heat up.
    Is there any way to have a post-slicer G code filter than could adjust the z-axis for the first two or three layers (raising in the center a tad but by layer 3 it has levelled out).

    Just kicking around some ideas. I've only printed small things so that the experienced height difference never covers that of the whole bed. At least I know if I should always position something long with the long section on the Y-axis for less high spot traversal.

  9. #19
    3D Printer Legend
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    956
    Post Thanks / Like
    I just happened upon this thread... but I found it interesting that B-glass is coming in with flatness issues.
    I just checked my 17cmx17cm plate and it appears dead-flat linear and an ever so slight bow across the diagonals in the range of a few micron.
    I'm going to suggest there are grades of Borosilicate. Optical flatness is a good reference for what we need.

    Here they refer to flatness in regard to "technical grade" glass https://www.pgo-online.com/intl/kata...eet-glass.html

  10. #20
    3D Printer Legend
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    956
    Post Thanks / Like
    I just ordered a second one. I will see if this one is also flat. I'm planning on heating this one.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Sticking you Part to the Build Plate...
    By TommyDee in forum Cube3
    Replies: 93
    Last Post: 06-15-2017, 02:46 AM
  2. "Print plate not detected" Error on Cube3
    By bolsoncerrado in forum Cube3
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-06-2017, 04:54 PM
  3. Create glass effect using watson filament
    By bolsoncerrado in forum Latest News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-20-2016, 12:02 PM
  4. Create glass effect using watson filament
    By bolsoncerrado in forum 3D Print Materials & Filaments
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-18-2016, 04:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •