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  1. #1
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    Built Plate Stabilizer

    Hey guys, gals - Nothing new here but wanted to share some insight.
    We are discussing this little print...
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3803078
    I recommend PLA as that is what I have experience with.

    I have fitted only one plate with this device and I really wasn't looking forward to doing it again. I didn't remove the carriage frame from the printer last time. This is about how life got so much simpler with no clamps or mess.

    The print might need a little sanding to have a smooth fit around the magnets. It should slip on easily but not loosely. Spend a little time making sure the frame has a comfortable fit. It should not be harder to remove from the printer than it was before. You can use the printer to make sure you can slip the holder over all 3 magnets without too much resistance.

    This time I did pull the carriage frame. I pulled the 2 screws and lo, I find the belt to be continuous. Interesting. Make sure your adjusters are not loose and then remove the two screws that hold the frame to the carriage.

    A friend got me some 2-sided tape from hell from Tap Plastics. This is 8-mil but there are other tenacious double sided tapes that work just as well. I mounted the tape to the pads of the holder and trimmed them up a little.

    20210322_193126.jpg

    Next I removed the pink liners and pushed the printed holder to the carriage frame so there is a little clearance between the 8 tabs and the build plate;

    20210322_193507.jpg

    Next, make sure the magnet is centered as best as you can tell, then push the printed holder to the build plate.


    Remove the Carriage frame and replace it on the printer making sure the belt is properly captured by the serrations on the carriage frame.

    20210322_193617.jpg

    This plate won't ever shift again.

    The one I mentioned earlier has been working for probably 2 years. The tines have deformed from the heat gun but the fit is still perfect. This is a fresh picture of the one on Thingiverse;

    20210322_103721.jpg

    If you like this, you may also want to review the OverBrim HERE
    Last edited by TommyDee; 03-23-2021 at 04:35 AM.

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  3. #2
    Regular 3D Printer
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    Nice stuff! will try

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  5. #3
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    Hi Tommy!
    I want to thank you very much for sharing this development and also encouraging other members to do it and take the advantage of using it.

    I was thinking in a way to stabilize the build plate but, as I always do, I did a search to know if there would be some solution already do previous to face all the development by myself... that was the moment when I found your post. It was really great because the design is nice and technically perfect!

    I, as a desktop CNC milling machine developer and manufacturer, perfectly know the importance of two values in a CNC machine specs that frequently are overlooked or ignored by many user... those specifications are Positioning Accuracy and Accuracy of Repeated Positioning.

    In the case of our Cube machines, although holding the built plate to the carriage by magnetic means is easy and comfortable, this system is not precise at all.
    At normal printing speeds the fill of plastic is (micro)pulling all the plate in its direction introducing some small error in the positioning accuracy but it is really worse when the machine makes rapid movements. In this case the build plate inertia shakes its a lot making the repeated positioning unpredictable.
    Of course I am not talking about milimeters but quite enough to be able to see with naked eyes misalignment between layers and centers in the part printed compared with the original design.

    This problem is even more evident when you are printing two, three or more copies of the same part at the same time. Then one may fit good but others no so good at all.

    This is what your development solved nicely. It works perfectly, it is easy to implement and adds a quite a bit of precision to the machine and the parts being printed!

    I used a surgical knife to shave the holes around the magnets in very thing layers until then adapted perfectly (I found PLA quite difficult to file or sand smoothly). Then I used a strong 2-sides tape to fix the 8 pads to the plate without removing the carriage from the machine. Then I take the build plate out of the machine and add some RTV in some parts just to be sure that the stabilizer will not move any more.

    I am attaching a couple pictures of my implementation and one of a sample printed after doing it:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Leonardo; 05-20-2021 at 08:02 PM.

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  7. #4
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    Wow, those prints came out nice. Is that with OEM slicer?? I really need to add this to my printer!

  8. #5
    3D Printer Noob
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    Hi Doug, I just use the Cube Print 4.03 that came with the machine. I have not had the opportunity to try another slicer yet.
    Last edited by Leonardo; 05-20-2021 at 11:31 PM.

  9. #6
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    I am happy you found use for the stabilizer Leonardo. Fixed indexing is exactly what I was going for ;]
    Lived without it for a long time but it really does solve that last bastion of niggles.

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