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  1. #1
    3D Printer Noob
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    Question Inherited Departments Old Cubepro Duo, need some pointers

    Hey all, got my department's old CubePro Duo, need some pointers.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w55...ew?usp=sharing

    In that link, I have a pic of a recent print I made. It's a small part of a campus map print I'm trying to make, and as you can tell, it has a few gaps in the top layer that I'd like to get rid of (my airpods included for scale).

    It's printing at 200mm, fill spacing 4, 6 top layers, 4 bottom layers, 2 outer walls, and printing with ABS white.

    I've adjusted the the Z gap to where a piece of paper is just barely dragging when placed under the nozzle, made sure that the filament does not have kinks and pulls out smoothly.

    Any ideas on what I can do make the top layer a bit more smooth? Im open to any advice! Please let me know if you need any more info.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Attachment 4381

  2. #2
    Regular 3D Printer
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    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    I am assuming you're using Simplify3d(?) based on your settings statement. It appears to me that you are under extruding. 6 top layers is plenty to get a nice surface. When I am working on a new profile, my goal is a nice finish (or very close) with 3 top layers. My profile for OEM ABS is set to .4mm nozzle and 1.00 extrusion multiplier. OEM ABS is different than retail - the biggest difference is that it prints well at 260C vs. 250C of most retail filament. You'll most likely find that you need to perform additional tweaks until you are happy.

    That z gap sounds very tight to me. I go with .1mm (paper or cube3 z-gap gauge) for the Cube 3 but I start with .45mm with CubePro and then run the calibration print file (still available on 3D Systems site). You'll even find a guide for it that instructs how to adjust each corner based on the results. Nylon and Wood need a little more z-gap but there are calibration print files for those also. #easybutton

  3. #3
    3D Printer Noob
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    I was using the Cubpro software, I didn't realize that there was another software available for the CubePro!

    I will have to check out Simplify3D and see if it can give me the options I need. I'll also loosen up the Z gap just a tad for my next test print. I'll also check out that calibration print file and see if it can help me out. Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by dougk12 View Post
    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    I am assuming you're using Simplify3d(?) based on your settings statement. It appears to me that you are under extruding. 6 top layers is plenty to get a nice surface. When I am working on a new profile, my goal is a nice finish (or very close) with 3 top layers. My profile for OEM ABS is set to .4mm nozzle and 1.00 extrusion multiplier. OEM ABS is different than retail - the biggest difference is that it prints well at 260C vs. 250C of most retail filament. You'll most likely find that you need to perform additional tweaks until you are happy.

    That z gap sounds very tight to me. I go with .1mm (paper or cube3 z-gap gauge) for the Cube 3 but I start with .45mm with CubePro and then run the calibration print file (still available on 3D Systems site). You'll even find a guide for it that instructs how to adjust each corner based on the results. Nylon and Wood need a little more z-gap but there are calibration print files for those also. #easybutton

  4. #4
    Regular 3D Printer
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    Ohhh, 200 micron (.2mm) print resolution. OK, in that case it looks like you have a partial clog, damaged/swollen internal PTFE tube or are using retail ABS that doesn't work well with the OEM profile being used.

    If you have some PVA or cleaner filament, feed 6-10" of it through at 260C then reload the ABS and try again. If it's really bad, you might have to feed some cleaner filament - stop - let cool - remove the PJ and pull the filament out cold. It's a pain but usually leaves the inside nice and clean.

  5. #5
    3D Printer Noob
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    D'oh, yes .200! And I will also note that the material I have is quite old, was stored in the back of a broom closet for years, and already open and not inside of any protective container.

    I've since ordered some new OEM ABS / PLA that will be in it its original packaging and hopefully still good quality.

    I will try that technique though and see if it does the trick. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by dougk12 View Post
    Ohhh, 200 micron (.2mm) print resolution. OK, in that case it looks like you have a partial clog, damaged/swollen internal PTFE tube or are using retail ABS that doesn't work well with the OEM profile being used.

    If you have some PVA or cleaner filament, feed 6-10" of it through at 260C then reload the ABS and try again. If it's really bad, you might have to feed some cleaner filament - stop - let cool - remove the PJ and pull the filament out cold. It's a pain but usually leaves the inside nice and clean.

  6. #6
    Regular 3D Printer
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    Cool!

    I would advise that OEM ABS = good but OEM PLA = bad. PLA is made out of corn and is compostable, even if it's been sealed in mylar for the past 5+ years it's very brittle. And there is no reason to actively seek it out since retail PLA works just fine in the printer with OEM slicer. It is usable in the Pro but you'll find it breaking in the feed tube frequently, sometimes in the middle of a print.

    I think the CubePro carts had ~800 grams of PLA and the Cube2 carts had ~300 grams of filament, so ~17$ or ~7$ worth if retail filament.

  7. #7
    3D Printer Noob
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    I can use retail on a CubePro? I thought it could only use proprietary filament, hence the specialized cartridges. I'll have to do some googling.

    Quote Originally Posted by dougk12 View Post
    Cool!

    I would advise that OEM ABS = good but OEM PLA = bad. PLA is made out of corn and is compostable, even if it's been sealed in mylar for the past 5+ years it's very brittle. And there is no reason to actively seek it out since retail PLA works just fine in the printer with OEM slicer. It is usable in the Pro but you'll find it breaking in the feed tube frequently, sometimes in the middle of a print.

    I think the CubePro carts had ~800 grams of PLA and the Cube2 carts had ~300 grams of filament, so ~17$ or ~7$ worth if retail filament.

  8. #8
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    You might google around this site - things are posted everywhere ;]

  9. #9
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    Nah dawg the only thing that printer cares about is the chip on that cartridge. If the material code filament type on the chip matches the material code filament type in the print file, it will accept it and begin carrying out the g-code instructions.

    Aside from the OEM ABS, which prints at a higher temp than retail, I've never had an issue with retail filament. Even the OEM "Flex" is just NinjaFlex 85A and "Wood" is just wood PLA. I'm sure there is a good match for the OEM ABS but I haven't put forth the effort to find it.

 

 

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