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  1. #1
    3D Printer Noob
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    Add a Heated Bed to Cube3

    After searching and searching for solutions to heat the Cube3 print bed, I managed to adapt some other methods for a solution that works on the Cube3.

    (will post pics later)

    Here is a quick run-down of the hardware I used:
    • 12V adjustable power supply brick (mfg: Meanwell)
    • WILLHI WH7016K Digital Temp Controller (ebay)
    • 10 Gauge Silicon Wire
    • 2.3ohm 25W power resistors (qty: 6)
    • Thermal grease
    • 115C thermal safety switch
    • 5-32V DC Solid State Relay
    • JST male-female connectors (qty: 2)
    • HXT 4mm bullet connectors
    • X3-0512 Screw terminal blocks
    • 15A power switch w/computer AC socket
    • various fasteners, screws, drill bits and taps
    • 6 inch wide roll of Kapton tape


    The thick silicon wire is overkill for this project, FYI.

    Due to the print plate being magnetic and removable, I had to remove the plastic housing that surrounds the stepper and the print plate support frame. remove the 8 screws from the bottom of the case, remove a couple of screws that hold the magnetic arms onto the Y axis sled and you can remove the clear top plate. You'll then see three screws that hold the bottom shell onto the frame (allen or torx bit needed here.) With this removed, there is no more issue of clearance between the print plate's attached resistors and the plastic shell eye candy.

    One I built the setup, I found I needed to adjust the power supply to it's maximum voltage to yield 90C-95C, which I am working to confirm the temp output. The resistors could possible be lowered a tad in value in order to use a slightly lower voltage.

    During printing, the temp of the bed seems to rise a bit, which makes sense given the model I was printing is small and is centered on the print bed, right over the temp probe.
    Last edited by Cosmoneer; 01-17-2017 at 04:44 PM. Reason: Updated BOM details

  2. #2
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    Sounds interesting! Let's see the pics

  3. #3
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    Lightbulb

    Here is a pic of a small part printed in ABS, no issues with curling due to cooling.\

    KIMG0119.jpg


    Here is a pic with the power supply and the temp controller on top.
    KIMG0121.jpg


    Here is the back side of the power supply, showing the A/C power switch and plug, along with the DC solid-state relay, being controlled by the temp controller.
    KIMG0122.jpg


    Here is the back view of the plate while it is all the way forward with the wires fully extended. I drafted a plate to cover the belt so the wires wouldn't get cut if they happened to lay on it during printing with the plate all the way vertical.
    KIMG0125.jpg


    Here is a pic of the bottom of the plate itself showing the resistors wired in series/parallel. Notice the temp sensor and the temp safety switch in the middle of the plate.
    KIMG0126.jpg


    Here is the temp controller. The internal relay is rated for 10amps, but I preferred to use a solid state relay just in case I needed to pull more power than the controller could handle. Due to how this particular controller is wired, I had to reverse how it is intended to work and use the ground connection through the relay when it activates. I assume this is because this particular model is designed for a peltier cooler. Regardless, it currently works as intended.
    KIMG0129.jpg


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  5. #4
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    Wow, nice job!!

    I've always considered the fact of printing some leg elevators for the cube and put any additional electronics / power supplies down there for aesthetic purposes

  6. #5
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    This could be done as a membrane with temperature sensing built in. Not sure how shallow the thermal fuse could be. Would not be hard to make a product of it.
    The idea is a simple flex circuit (industrial heating pads).

    85.8 degrees C, right? Are you also flowing cool air? I get a lot of issues with ABS not hardening fast enough and curling back in.

  7. #6
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    I run the plate up as high as it will go for the initial layer, which is around 92-94 degrees C. During printing, the head puts off so much heat the bed gets warmer and if the part is small enough, the bed will rise to over 100 degress C in the middle of the bed (where the thermistor and thermal fuses are.)

    Once the initial layer is deposited, I drop the temp to around 85-88 degrees C, depending on the size of the part.

    I've gotten fewer issues with part curling with this plate, and that is without using ANY adhesives. If the part is larger, then I will leave the temp higher, at say 90 degrees C.

    The room temp is a stead 74 degrees F and the printer is running the cooling fans for the print head. I don't know if my ABS is cooling fast enough or not. I do know that with the Glow in the dark Green ABS it is almost impossible to see the layers in the finished print. From what I can tell, the part is quite rock solid. When I print PLA on an unheated bed, I will almost always get stratified layers that will break apart with minor force applied.

    As for the membrane, I looked at those being offered. The problem with most membranes is that they have no provision for the magnets for the removable print plate. I went this route to keep the existing printer functionality intact. I suppose, though, you could put the membrane on top of the print plate and then clamp borosilicate glass on top of that.

  8. #7
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    It is a wonderful way to do this, don't get me wrong. Thank for sharing your detailed experience. I like ABS for its melding capabilities. But the only other way to manage it is building on supports.

    I was also thinking to replace the plate with a thick circuit board with the element traces under a thin full clad layer. Add the holes for the magnets prior to lamination, and you have a build plate looking for power. What are you using for the thermal fuse?

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    What are you using for the thermal fuse?
    Hi Tommy,

    I listed it in the BOM as a 115C thermal safety switch, which is normally closed. The switch opens when it over-temps and the temp controller alarms and stops sending power to the plate.


    http://www.ebay.com/itm/KSD9700-Temp...-/292110026379

    ThermalSwitch.JPG

    - - - - - - - - - -

    One note to anyone who might want to take this mod on, I will be replacing the stiff wiring that ties into the junction block with silicon wiring the simply routes through the block, the same way I did the high current thick silicon wire.

    I have also been getting vastly improved ABS layer adhesion by placing my printer in a DIY ventilated acrylic chamber. When I get some time, I'll have to post pictures and the 3D parts I built that help you construct the chamber.

    -Cosmoneer

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Hi all,

    After using my heated bed for some time, the white coating on the print plate eventually started cracking and separating from the aluminum plate. My solution? I removed it. Once removed, I had to sand down the drilled holes and fill them in with high temp epoxy. I then sanded the aluminum plate until smooth and purchased a borosilicate glass plate from eBay (210mmx210mm, I believe) and some metal screw clamps so I can remove the glass as needed.

    In order to calibrate with the glass, I have to place a temporary piece of white paper onto the print bed until it fails and then I go into manual mode to set the Z-gap, otherwise, I use an older unaltered print plate and swap them out when it comes time to set the Z gap.

    I stopped using the kapton tape and opted for a liquid glue that dries onto the glass but can be washed off. This glue is only tacky while hot but will let the part detach from it when it cools off.

    Aside from everything else, I have found that other's suggestions to use 200 micron print resolution over the 70 micron has been wonderful. There is very little difference between print quality, but the print time is far less for the 200 micron resolution, so I obviously stick with that.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    I wanted to post the source for the glue I am using for ABS on a glass plate.

    Here is the glue:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/240ml-8oz-3...EAAOSwOgdYs1at

    Glue.png

    The properties of this glue are very interesting. As long as the glue is heated to ~70C, it seems to hold well for a reasonable amount of printed surface area. My experience with this glue shows the hotter it is, the less likely it will curl on the corners. Lately I have been printing with a bed temperature of 98C in an enclosed (but ventilated) chamber.

    What I like about this glue is that when the plate cools, the print just pops off. No prying or other crazy steps needed to remove the print. Because of this, I have two glass plates I swap out. I use an Ove-Glove to handle the hot plate and unscrew the clamps on the edges (3 of them). I then put the fresh plate onto the heated bed and clamp the glass down. Don't over tighten the screws!

    After a while of applying the glue a few times, you can revert to just wetting the applicator with water and wiping the glass plate. The glue turns an amazing clear but will retain its holding power. You will need to reapply more from time to time, as some glue is removed with the print and will need to be replaced.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Here are the glass clamps I use.

    Clamp.png

    Due to the small plate and where the belt and other items are located, I can only get 3 clamps on my plate, which seems to work fine. I use mine with the screw pointed down, so as not to interfere with the print. The clamps do take up some space on the print bed, so do factor that in when you are printing large prints. I have not tried double sided tape or anything of that sort yet.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/4-x-Heated-...gAAOSwniRWN1hs

    - - - - - - - - - -

    The glass plate is a 170mm x 170mm Borosilicate plate.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/170mm-x-170...0AAOSw9GhYbszu

    These plates cool quickly from the highest temp I print at (98C) and with the glue mentioned above, release my parts without issue. A quick wash/rinse, sometimes with soap, and my parts are good to go.


    Due to my continued use of the magnetic plate, my heated bed is tethered to the printer, since the power supply is mounted on top. I have printed over 100 hours of ABS on this print plate and the only heating issues I have run into are issues with the thermal switch wires and how they were attached to the plate. The silicon rubber power wires have not had any issue, whereas the other non-silicon wires have been breaking due to fatigue at the screw joints at the edge of the plate.

    The only revisions I will make in the future are:

    1> Move all solder joints to a fixed point on the underside of the plate
    2> Replace the small diameter non-silicon wires with more flexible and heat resistant silicon wiring.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    85.8 degrees C, right? Are you also flowing cool air? I get a lot of issues with ABS not hardening fast enough and curling back in.
    As of late, I have been printing above 95C (according to the temp controller) and am not seeing curling issues on most parts. Larger parts will curl at the corners occasionally. On some smaller parts, I find that I have to reduce the temperature.

    One part in particular are these part-within-a-part pieces (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:869004). If the bed is too hot (above 70C-80C), then the legs will adhere to the hub and will break instead of snapping lose from each other. Printing these parts above 85C will net you at least one broken leg. Printing above 90C will net you two or more broken legs.

    There seems to be a tradeoff at some point. The higher temps provide better later adhesion while you are also approaching maintaining a 3D print in a near liquid-like state.

    When I have smaller parts, I have found that when I print at higher temps, I have a higher yield from parts when I print a bunch on the plate and the print head moves off a part to add a layer to an adjacent part, thus allowing the newly added layer to cool before the print head comes back for the next layer.
    Last edited by Cosmoneer; 08-24-2017 at 10:06 PM. Reason: Added image of thermal switch

 

 

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