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  1. #151
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Oh... I get you...

    No, I am using the cube3_decoder executable in Windows 7.
    It's a fairly straight forward cut and paste

    To be clear, the CAD images are Creo Parametric (what was once Pro|Engineer).
    The slicer file is a .cube3 from the Cube3 application in Windows 7.

    save the cube3 file from the Default Cube3 app.
    drop the file on the executable
    notepad makes quick work of the image characters below the last M107 command in the generated .bfb file
    import the .bfb into Excel as text/space delimited/data type text
    filter column A with "G1"
    highlight columns B,C,&D ctrl-C; then paste that into notepad
    in notepad, replace all characters X, Y, and then Z with nothing
    optionally remove the purge point locations at the start (2) and the end (8?) of the file
    save the file as a .pts file
    import the .pts file into Creo CAD and do magic with the numbers

    Anyway, yes, I am using what I have at hand to analyze the 3D Systems slicer.
    The release of this simple decoder allowed me to do this, finally!

    This method can be used for gathering any point cloud.
    The software in which you want to use it will have a specific format.
    The method described above will yield a space delimited series of X, Y, and Z values in Ascii.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Cracked another code in the Cube App slicer...

    Design element for designers:
    WELL BONDED PERMIMETER WALLS FOR FLAT OBJECTS

    If you want a first-layer trace-only but a solid face following, try the following in your design;
    Make your trace width 1.68mm (1.7). This creates a 4-wide trace that fuses reasonably well because the center two traces are stuffed between the first two.
    For the most part, it looks like only 3 traces
    Make this first trace layer 0.20mm deep.
    Somehow the layer thickness of "200um" is actually 0.1975mm so it counts for a complete layer.

    The next layer surprised me. Now that I have 4 traces lain, the second layer runs 2 traces along the perimeter.
    So I have two traces to "stick" the solid layer to... and you'd think... or hope it would just draw all the way across the part.
    But no, it stops at the details within the first layer.
    This is not a problem as inner traces on the first layer are also 1.68mm wide and therefore the solid print on the second layer has a shelf to tack onto.
    Talk about GAP! But there is a reason for this. A couple as a matter of fact.

    Do you hate printing thing with large surfaces because they always curl on you, or you feel you need sidewalks?
    Or the opposite of not being able to release the print from LokBuild when there is a large flat area attached?


    I do need to add one thing I noted quickly; your export precision settings do matter.
    If any physical width in the print goes to 1.5mm anywhere (tested down to 1.6mm width), the trace count reduces from 4 to 2.

    Another design tip is when infill starts.
    I need to confirm this, but infill can be avoided if you stay under 7 layers.
    For some reason, it always lays 4 layers on the build plate, and it finishes up with 3 layer on the top surface.
    This is a nice design tip to keep in mind.
    Remember, 0.1975*7=1.3825mm ...or there about will make for a solid print.
    The actual print will come out to around 1.5mm when you run a generous gap as I do.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    TextureOption.PNG

    Texture!

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Ha! Put up or shut up, right?

    One thing that occurred to me is that this method of recessing a face would help with ABS.
    Done, yes it helps with all the usual caveats.

    LokBuild with glue using 3D Solutech Joy-Pack ABS White:

    ABSvane_1.PNG
    I've been lucky on my other LokBuild sheets but this one's been stubborn.
    Repurposed glue to always have glue on the plate; just add water and let dry ... well, sort of.
    This plate also has a 6" square moat around it :|


    No elephant foot on the 1st layers; no curling (feel the need to knock on wood!).

    ABSvane_2.PNG
    Just saying that curl avoidance doesn't mean stuffing your print into the build plate.


    The treatment is the same as PLA. All the stringy lines -are- attached

    ABSvane_3.PNG

    This kind of treatment could be used on larger rectangular surfaces to relieve some of the thermal stress.
    A kind of millennial wicker

    Not to mention much easier removal of the print from the build plate!

    4 out of 5 for 3D Solutech ABS joy-pack refills have been excellent!
    Actually, if you wanted to find them, they are Joy-Packs on Amazon.
    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_p...rnid=126834011
    (not spamming.... just sharing!)

    I've got a question into them to find out if the formulation is any different from their 1.75mm reels.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Time to put a caveat on the previous posts...
    Learned something new though.

    Ever notice that the infill on the first layer is sometimes pulled far away from the first 2 outer traces?
    There is a reason, and it affects the above posts.

    Quick narrative is that straight walls (upward) along the side (Z) will follow the rules and guidelines outlined above.

    If the part has a taper inward right from the get-go, the above method of "stick relief" or "texturizing" won't work.
    When it comes to the second layer, the offset inward of the fill traces do not get staked to the first 4 traces created by the first layer.
    This will require more experiments to understand the slicer's behavior.

    If you are following where this discussion has been going, this will make more sense.
    But if you find yourself some day needing this information, of course I will clarify if I can.

    - - - - - - - - - -
    <gasp>

    LokBuild.PNG

    A little LokBuild luv.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 04-17-2018 at 06:40 AM.

  2. #152
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    that last piece looks a bit familiar!

  3. #153
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    ... you don't have to count the layers, Todd. This one is based on .16" thickness.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Okay, a MeshMixer update alert:

    Do you get a message that MM cannot connect to your account with the latest (v3.4) update?

    Well, there is aV3.5 that the update-me tool doesn't see for some reason.
    I went and got to the download page and created a new account (not knowing if I had another account).
    Download overwrites v3.4 and all is transparent again.

    Just thought you'd like to know they released this on April 17th, 2018.

    https://apps.autodesk.com/FUSION/en/...autostart=true
    Nothing autostarts... you have to click on the Download on the upper right hand corner. This is a safe click.

    It will take you to a login page. If you have one, great, if not, create one. The rest is seamless.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Another find while you are there...
    Find their free slicer... not slicer... Slicer! (you'll get it )
    https://apps.autodesk.com/FUSION/en/...ng=en&os=Win64

    - - - - - - - - - -

    I've had this full 1kg spool of Inland yellow ABS for quite some time.
    After the first print, I realized this is pure junk.
    It popped and spit nearly every inch of filament it laid down.
    Prints were simply unusable.

    Yesterday I tried "drying" it in the oven.
    I had it backing between 85 to 107 degrees C (not very controllable!) for nearly 5 hours.

    I printed a few things with the backed material. Pops are still there but greatly reduced.
    The print is stronger! But still not right.

    Lesson learned; you can help poor filament, but you might not be able to correct it.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Today I got to test the "live cartridge refill" in the middle of a print.

    This is using the fitting-less solution on a KISS cartridge.
    I ran the previous filament to within inches of the filament mechanism.
    Paused the printer and removed the hot-end connection being careful not to trigger the "head present switch".

    The printer stayed in pause mode while I was rebuilding the cartridge.

    Mated the cartridge back to the printer and sure enough, the print continued without issues.

    Quick note: the M6 version of the new KISS cartridges is a little harder to remove only in the fact that the grippers are still in place.
    They may rasp the tubing which is fine (never going to release this tubing!) but the twisting of the nut is not quite as simple as a loosely spinning nut.
    Not impossible and certainly not a show stopper. Just a side-note.

    And to be sure, the PLA printed nozzle set and the KISS fitting-less solution just ran a completely full stock cartridge with 3D Solutech "Pig-Pink" filament (my name for it).

    I am now convinced we have a means to "restore" a stock PLA cartridge with minimal effort and expense.

    ABS is to be determined. I will test that theory soon now that I have some clear ABS from 3D Solutech.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Blue tubing is pretty

    purdy.PNG

    Ohhhh... s i l v e r o v e r - b r a i d <ooohhhhhh....laaahhhhhhhlahha......>

    - - - - - - - - - -

    De-Hub

    de-hub.PNG

    Just for fun.
    The upper points are the part that rests on the little foam pads on the printer.
    Chip pocket is still there. All for the price of an M5 tap.

    Now you'd think that you can put the stock spool on there and be happy, right?
    Not so fast. This is missing the despooler route (capture of the feed tube).
    But for external spools, yep, this is way simple.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 04-21-2018 at 12:15 AM.

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  5. #154
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    How did you cut the PC?

  6. #155
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Rotary tool cutoff wheel and sanding drum.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Again, I recommend a scroll saw or copping saw just to manage particles.

  7. #156
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    Do you know if it's PC or just acrylic? I could try cutting one on my laser cutter hmmmm

  8. #157
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    Good question.
    The spool is the only thing marked and it is marked -triangle-7, >PC<.
    I'm going to assume all the parts are PC.

    A laser edge would be nice!

  9. #158
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    Lasers cant cut PC "healthy"

  10. #159
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Never knew that. Where can I find a laser toxin risk list?

  11. #160
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    Well desktop/semipro lasers (those you could run at home) can (usually) only cut acrylic, wood and paper/cardboard. So the list is quite short for the "healthy" side. Any plastic that contains chlorine (like PVC/Vinyl) is unhealthy for both the owner and the machine.

 

 

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