Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  3
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Hi

    Quote Originally Posted by northwoodsguy View Post
    Just ordered a CR-10S which will be here on Thursday. This is my first 3d Printer, so I am not sure what tips or help I will need. I did order LOKBUILD, as I read on some boards that this will help with adhesion during the printing. Any help? Anything I need to do, check, or verify? Thanks..
    Get

    The only thing i did was get purple glue stick and level the bed. I have run through 4 kilos of filament without a problem.

  2. #12
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Lincoln, UK
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    product_thumb.jpg500pcs-lot-Universal-US-TO-font-b-EU-b-font-AC-Power-font-b-Plug-b.jpg

    Hi

    Revived my CR10 a week ago, but still having trouble getting it together.

    Has anyone here in the UK received their printer with foreign power leads. (Not UK style).

    When the printer arrived it had 2 leads, one had 2 pin plug and the other one was a very strange 3 pin plug but definitely not for the UK.
    Last edited by Fabian; 10-12-2017 at 09:42 PM.

  3. #13
    3D Printer God(dess)
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,413
    Post Thanks / Like
    The strange one is NEMA 5-15. This is a USA plug.

    The two prong version is somewhat EU universal.
    it is also an adapter for the NEMA 5-15.

    Rarely do manufacturers provide other options.
    Typically, if you have a different standard in your country, you can buy any IEC320-C13 (that is the "the business end") cord that is appropriate for your country.
    Optionally, there are many universal adapters out there. That will allow you to plug in different power cords into the adapter.
    The universal adapter you want is the one that will properly mate to your wall sockets.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 10-13-2017 at 02:32 AM.

  4. #14
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Lincoln, UK
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks TommyDee for replying

    It turns out I had an old flat screen monitor that I bought from a car boot sale in my garage with a plug exactly the same as the one on the back of the control box. So it all turned out OK.

    Thanks again.

    Fabian.

  5. #15
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Just got my CR-10 5s with touchscreen, but am having trouble.
    The Z-axis moves in response to input on the screen, but the X and Y axes will not move. I just get loud buzzing noises from the motors and they get hot. The noise stops if I click the micro switch for the axis.
    The X and Y axes move freely with the power off.

    Does anyone have any ideas?

  6. #16
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hi
    I am thinking of getting a 3D printer.
    I use Autocad 2000 and have a lot of 3d drawings (DWG)
    How do I change them into something that the Creality Cr-10 can use to print?
    Thanks Sam

  7. #17
    3D Printer God(dess)
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,413
    Post Thanks / Like
    You will need to create 3 dimensional models. Flat drawings only make flat parts.

  8. #18
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    They are in 3D (X-Y-Z).
    I need to know what I need to put it in the printer format?
    Thank San

  9. #19
    3D Printer God(dess)
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,413
    Post Thanks / Like
    The format that the printer understands is known as a "facet" file disguised with extensions such as .stl, .obj, .wrl... etc.
    There is precious little you can do with these in Creo, but it will generate these files.

    I would suggest opening the 3D model and use the save-as to create an .STL file.
    You will see some options and when you apply them, they will show on your model.
    This is exactly what will be in your file.

    The output file can be read by your slicer software.
    One intermediate piece of free software I recommend is Meshmixer by Autodesk.
    This program can manipulate and enhance printable part files.

    After this there are slicer programs.
    This is something that converts the STL files to layers that the printer understands known as G-Code.
    Slicers are Cura, Simplify3D, and others.

    Let us know how you get on with these instructions.
    Last edited by TommyDee; 03-23-2018 at 08:42 PM.

  10. #20
    3D Printer Noob
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    I think I can save my autocad file to a STL file.
    Then I should down Meshmixer by autodesk and open my file into it?
    Then what?
    Save it and use my computer to run the Printer?
    Sam

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •