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  1. #111
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    mine didn't work it clogs the tip and now i can't print anything

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    This is a work in progress.

    We want to make this:

    Attachment 1927

    Using this:



    God help us!

    - - - - - - - - - -

    This is the why it works part section, merge, lost discussion, whatever...

    Anatomy of the modularized Cube 3 extruder nozzle

    Attachment 1928
    Stock tip; stock spring, stock length of tubing (3mm OD PTFE optional), 5mm thread push-to-connect fitting with caveats.
    Unmodified housing on the left, and modified housing on the right.

    The reason this works is because the short length of tubing is trapped within the modular nozzle.

    Attachment 1929
    Many of the 5mm thread fittings have a hex drive that is 2.5mm.
    The 3mm tubing will not fit through these fitting.
    This is one of the important elements that makes this work.
    And is required to have successful hot-swap capability.

    The challenge is cutting a decent 5mm thread in the housing.

    Attachment 1930
    This mod is highly dependent on the fitting you obtain.
    The challenge is not the thread, per-se, but the counterbore/flat area.
    You can flatten the whole top with a file if nothing else comes to mind.

    Notice where the 3mm tubing is in the picture?

    In the end, this is what the insides look like.

    Attachment 1931
    The tube should only be 1/4mm shorter than the path allows.

    We're still working on the how-to and where to get materials.
    This should give you a working knowledge of what this is attempting to do.

    And it works!

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Bo, I don't like this merge cr@p! I cannot link to specific sections which I can on every other instructable I've ever done.

  2. #112
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Hello Jack and welcome to the forum.

    I'd love to help if I can, Jack.
    I ran these modified 3DS nozzle housings for quite some time without issues.
    Yet, I know where issues tend to emerge from.

    First place I'd look is the chain where the tube runs inside the housing.
    a) does the fitting have a nice 2-2.2mm hole with no chamfer?
    b) with the tube fully bottomed out in the nozzle, is there a little clearance at the fitting, say 0.5mm (.02")?
    c) with the tube fully bottomed out in the nozzle, is there a large clearance at the fitting, say more than 0.5mm?
    d) did you carve out the little notch where the tube bends inside?
    e) did you clean the nozzle by reverse feeding a wire strand through the output side of the nozzle ... using a butane torch -VERY- carefully ... in order to see if you have any carbon buildup in the tip?
    f) are you still using the barrel nut? -DON'T-

    To explain these observations; a chamfer in the fitting can cause the tube to sphincter on retract operations. This can create a deformation in the tube that will look like a constriction to incoming filament. This may lead to the second observation...

    As with the cartridges, if there was too much clearance between the bottom of the nozzle and the end of the tube, a larger 3mm melt would exist to fill the void. The heaters are not designed to heat filament all the way out at the outer wall of the stainless tube part of the nozzles. This means the melt will be a small constricted hole through the center through the plastic "donut" that is now a restrictor. The print result will look a lot like a clogged tip. Maintaining that clearance to near nill without pressure is what we want. Read on with regard to the required gap...

    When these nozzles are assembled, the level of the push-nut is variable. When the nozzle is installed, the spring is (should be) deflected and the housing is relieved of spring pressure. This means a small gap must be maintained for this slight motion, which can easily be 0.5mm depending on the position of the push-nut, which is assembled at its free-length, not knowing for sure the installed (working) length. As an aside, yes, setting the height of the push-nut to ensure engagement with the heater block is recommended. This recommendation includes making sure that your nozzle is bottoming out in the heater block consistently. This includes making sure no filament has worked its way around the edges of the black plate on the print head or drool from replacing tips. Basically a due diligence to ensure the design intent is met.

    This part of the track is very sensitive to routing. Somewhere I posted a picture of a rib that should be carved to make the curve smooth. If you post some pictures, I can see how well things are aligned. I remember there being a pretty small windows of where you wanted to drill the hole and thread it.

    One of the worst things you can do to these aluminum tips is to burn filament inside it. Not hard to do either! I've salvaged all my tips to date but when you recover one, you'll know it. And let it be known that I don't mix ABS and PLA tips randomly! You have to remove PLA from an ABS print with a very specific purge. As a matter of fact, this could be a custom .cube3 file just for the routine to manage the temperatures and material changes in a given nozzle. If you ever printed white 3DS ABS filament, you'd know that burning filament with the nozzle is not out of the question. If this provides sufficient warning, that should be enough said.

    The carbon that burning PLA deposits is stuck onto whatever surface burned it. This is a serious bond. Not something that comes off easily. Now, there is something called a Cold Pull that I learned about recently, but I'm not sure if I want to or need to go that far. That would be serious surgery in my book. I use regular torch lighters to heat up a tip sufficient to melt... just melt the filament inside. I know this because I have a single strand of copper wire testing the softness of the melt inside. At some point after 3 or 4 test-pokes, you'll get the wire to feed through the nozzle -backwards!-. You want to go through the exit end, with the melt at a sticky but -plastic- state. What this does is cause the melt to stick to the wire and drag it and all its gunk along with it. If it all comes out clean, great! But for tips with more use, it rarely does come out clean. you'll see some black blobs which are normally fine dust buildups that carbonized but their particle size keeps them floating. This you can remove with this method. Once you get them clean, your purge-flow should be straight out the nozzle and featureless. Not all blobby and veering to one side or curling back on itself.

    The only other tip is get yourself a 3mm drill-bit which is the exact ID of the tube. Mark the drill-bit at 20mm. This drill-bit can scrape the inside walls of the tube to remove weeping filament or assembly goo that 3DS used to put cartridges together. Really annoying. A pair of chucks can help hold things tights. But ream the tube out by hand. At 20mm, you'll hit aluminum. Stop there! This will ensure your PTFE tube will bottom out completely when re-assembling your nozzle and avoid pinching the tube and setting off cascading failures.

    Last but not least... tip on testing nozzle viability:
    Try taking the nozzle and only the upper housing and installing them with using a longer thin tube (the cartridge take-up tube maybe). You're gonna run open and bare.
    Put the tube into the housing where the fitting hole is... put the nozzle on the end of the tube. Now put the nozzle in the heater-block and install the upper housing (which the tube is going through). It just has to trigger a switch with the nub on the housing. The Cube should recognize this setup as an installed cartridge (need a chip active too, obviously). Load some filament in the tube leaving plenty to push through the nozzle. The material should match your chip! Now start the purge process. Once the Cube is up to temp, manually feed the filament to see how it looks. The idea being that you can 1) control pressure and 2) set up for a -cold pull-. Just be sure your PTFE tubing doesn't back out of the nozzle. Keep pressure on it near the nozzle while pushing in filament.

    Anything else I can explain
    Last edited by TommyDee; 12-22-2018 at 01:22 AM.

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  4. #113
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    First i would like to say thank you! and wow, i didn't expect such a fast and helpful response, thank you for takng the time to write all this, i will go thru all the things you mention later today when i get back home, i got this printer by pure luck because i can't afford to buy one, i got it because i want to make prosthetic hands for people that can't afford one and also for dogs and cats in my area and i want to make a filament extruder to recycle plastic bottles but that's something for next year. I was so angry at my self for breaking my machine, i was trying to make the aftermarket spool mod but instead i ended up with a clogged nozzle, i will post pictures later showing my progress.

    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyDee View Post
    Hello Jack and welcome to the forum.

    I'd love to help if I can, Jack.
    I ran these modified 3DS nozzle housings for quite some time without issues.
    Yet, I know where issues tend to emerge from.

    First place I'd look is the chain where the tube runs inside the housing.
    a) does the fitting have a nice 2-2.2mm hole with no chamfer?
    b) with the tube fully bottomed out in the nozzle, is there a little clearance at the fitting, say 0.5mm (.02")?
    c) with the tube fully bottomed out in the nozzle, is there a large clearance at the fitting, say more than 0.5mm?
    d) did you carve out the little notch where the tube bends inside?
    e) did you clean the nozzle by reverse feeding a wire strand through the output side of the nozzle ... using a butane torch -VERY- carefully ... in order to see if you have any carbon buildup in the tip?
    f) are you still using the barrel nut? -DON'T-

    To explain these observations; a chamfer in the fitting can cause the tube to sphincter on retract operations. This can create a deformation in the tube that will look like a constriction to incoming filament. This may lead to the second observation...

    As with the cartridges, if there was too much clearance between the bottom of the nozzle and the end of the tube, a larger 3mm melt would exist to fill the void. The heaters are not designed to heat filament all the way out at the outer wall of the stainless tube part of the nozzles. This means the melt will be a small constricted hole through the center through the plastic "donut" that is now a restrictor. The print result will look a lot like a clogged tip. Maintaining that clearance to near nill without pressure is what we want. Read on with regard to the required gap...

    When these nozzles are assembled, the level of the push-nut is variable. When the nozzle is installed, the spring is (should be) deflected and the housing is relieved of spring pressure. This means a small gap must be maintained for this slight motion, which can easily be 0.5mm depending on the position of the push-nut, which is assembled at its free-length, not knowing for sure the installed (working) length. As an aside, yes, setting the height of the push-nut to ensure engagement with the heater block is recommended. This recommendation includes making sure that your nozzle is bottoming out in the heater block consistently. This includes making sure no filament has worked its way around the edges of the black plate on the print head or drool from replacing tips. Basically a due diligence to ensure the design intent is met.

    This part of the track is very sensitive to routing. Somewhere I posted a picture of a rib that should be carved to make the curve smooth. If you post some pictures, I can see how well things are aligned. I remember there being a pretty small windows of where you wanted to drill the hole and thread it.

    One of the worst things you can do to these aluminum tips is to burn filament inside it. Not hard to do either! I've salvaged all my tips to date but when you recover one, you'll know it. And let it be known that I don't mix ABS and PLA tips randomly! You have to remove PLA from an ABS print with a very specific purge. As a matter of fact, this could be a custom .cube3 file just for the routine to manage the temperatures and material changes in a given nozzle. If you ever printed white 3DS ABS filament, you'd know that burning filament with the nozzle is not out of the question. If this provides sufficient warning, that should be enough said.

    The carbon that burning PLA deposits is stuck onto whatever surface burned it. This is a serious bond. Not something that comes off easily. Now, there is something called a Cold Pull that I learned about recently, but I'm not sure if I want to or need to go that far. That would be serious surgery in my book. I use regular torch lighters to heat up a tip sufficient to melt... just melt the filament inside. I know this because I have a single strand of copper wire testing the softness of the melt inside. At some point after 3 or 4 test-pokes, you'll get the wire to feed through the nozzle -backwards!-. You want to go through the exit end, with the melt at a sticky but -plastic- state. What this does is cause the melt to stick to the wire and drag it and all its gunk along with it. If it all comes out clean, great! But for tips with more use, it rarely does come out clean. you'll see some black blobs which are normally fine dust buildups that carbonized but their particle size keeps them floating. This you can remove with this method. Once you get them clean, your purge-flow should be straight out the nozzle and featureless. Not all blobby and veering to one side or curling back on itself.

    The only other tip is get yourself a 3mm drill-bit which is the exact ID of the tube. Mark the drill-bit at 20mm. This drill-bit can scrape the inside walls of the tube to remove weeping filament or assembly goo that 3DS used to put cartridges together. Really annoying. A pair of chucks can help hold things tights. But ream the tube out by hand. At 20mm, you'll hit aluminum. Stop there! This will ensure your PTFE tube will bottom out completely when re-assembling your nozzle and avoid pinching the tube and setting off cascading failures.

    Last but not least... tip on testing nozzle viability:
    Try taking the nozzle and only the upper housing and installing them with using a longer thin tube (the cartridge take-up tube maybe). You're gonna run open and bare.
    Put the tube into the housing where the fitting hole is... put the nozzle on the end of the tube. Now put the nozzle in the heater-block and install the upper housing (which the tube is going through). It just has to trigger a switch with the nub on the housing. The Cube should recognize this setup as an installed cartridge (need a chip active too, obviously). Load some filament in the tube leaving plenty to push through the nozzle. The material should match your chip! Now start the purge process. Once the Cube is up to temp, manually feed the filament to see how it looks. The idea being that you can 1) control pressure and 2) set up for a -cold pull-. Just be sure your PTFE tubing doesn't back out of the nozzle. Keep pressure on it near the nozzle while pushing in filament.

    Anything else I can explain

  5. #114
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    We're here to help, Jack. And we certainly wish to make sure you can provide the good works you are proposing. We'll get you up and running one way or another

    - - - - - - - - - -

    Funny how the sprites tease us.

    Today I had a tip clog on me. Mostly my fault but it was a good exercise.

    Here is the cleaning kit I use for basic cleaning:

    cleaningkit.PNG

    This failure was suspicious only in that I changed the print file to less retract. I was trying to change blobs.
    But this print failed twice in nearly the same area...
    A place where there was very little to print per layer and it went to slow mode.
    And eventually it got stuck. Some aid in pushing the filament by hand couldn't keep up.
    This file obviously needs a purge tower to keep the filament flowing (worked fine with PETG!).

    This is to say that certain prints just cause a fluke failure. I've pumped a full Kg of 3rd party filament through this tip.
    After several cleanings, all I found was a couple of carbon specs.
    Some of the red PLA filament was a bit stubborn in the bottom so it was definitely a contributor to the problem.
    I purged it out with 3DS PLA in the method I described above.
    I can confirm that the upper shell of the stock nozzle housing does fit in the print head and it does maintain the switch properly.
    This upper shell had a hole in it so I put the thin tube through and into the nozzle which was fully seated in the heater block without the spring.
    Pressure on the tube into the nozzle by hand... pressure into the nozzle of the filament... (not an easy feat with only 2 hands...) and only orange came out.
    Pull the setup one it cooled a bit and just warmed up the tip to release the melt, sure enough, more red came out.

    Fortunately, we don't have to maintain these tips too much. Fortunately, if you use benign filaments, you also don't wear tips out.
    I think a once in a Kg maintenance on the tip is pretty good.
    And 3DS metallic ABS filaments... they do build up some kind of "scum". These tips require attention a little more often.

    Thought I'd at least share what this day has added to this post.

  6. #115
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    I managed to unclog the tip thanks to your instructions now the next issue i have is the bed leveling, automatic does'nt work and no matter how i set the level pads it just gets the out of range error, the auto z is succesfull but when i print the bed clogs the nozzle on some areas and i have to stop it and un clog it again, i've been at it all week, i'll kep you posted, im on the 8th attempt today and it looks like it's working for now. I want to make sure before offering help to someone that needs a prosthetic so i don't mess up and i need to save enough to stack up on abs, maybe in the next few months i'll start helping out.

    Thank you for your help, i will post results as soon as it finishes printing.

  7. #116
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    I'm curious as to what the Cube3 does when it cannot level. I've done a little post on trying to remove autoleveling by dialing in near zero mechanical parallelism.
    I do this by listening for "ticks" as the tray and head traverses the full 6" in X and Y. If it does not tick at all (the tick is a z-motion action set in the auto-leveling routine), you've set it to perfect level by hand. Find a good neutral place to hold the bed up and use a gap tool to zero in on level. It takes patience. The threads on the magnets are probably fighting you by turning back the small adjustments you are trying to make. Persistence is key though. Good luck and happy new year!

 

 

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