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  1. #41
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    Excellent work! 3mm is about what I lost with magnets on a glass plate.

    You'd think they would have used nylon tipped screws for those adjustment locks

  2. #42
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    going to attempt this. having a time with ABS. Did the heat gun trick like you do TD, no luck.
    Going to control it using this
    https://www.amazon.com/Temperature-Controller-Display-Thermostat-Waterproof/dp/B07H2X4NNR/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=temperature+controller+heat+be d&qid=1569239890&s=gateway&sr=8-1
    heat bed- http://www.makerfarm.com/index.php/6x6-heat-bed.html

  3. #43
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    ...now where did I put that popcorn emoji?

  4. #44
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    popcorn? Im hungry now.

  5. #45
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    I use that temperature controller from its own power supply. It is okay. The relay controls an external FET board to switch the power to the heat pad. The heat pad has its own dedicated high current power supply. That supply can be voltage adjusted without effecting the temperature controller. I added a kill switch to un-power the heat pad when the y axis drops. It would be nice if the temperature controller had a setting for a lower idle temperature maybe 30'c lower than the build temperature rather than just off. One day I will add that but I want to keep the effort on the 3d print designs and not the tools. You do not need to worry too much abut the temperature controller. Just hard wiring it to a voltage or current adjustable power supply would be sufficient.

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    About a heated bed...I used one on the cube 3 for about a year now and am happy with the results. The full bed can be printed now with abs. I use only a light dusting of hairspray on glass. The added fans on the y axis keep heat from flowing to the cube 3. I have had some yellowing of the white plastic housing of the nozzles but I have reinforced the interface to the x axis slide with stainless steel sandwich. And sometimes the additional heat can trip the over heat switch between the nozzles cooling the nozzles and stripping the filament. Over course I have departed from the decorative box covering of the y axis. I was reluctant to remove the magnet but there has been no issue and bed leveling is rarely needed.

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    An example of something I can do now. Yes, I can afford to buy a new suitcase. I just wanted to see if it could be done.

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    Good luck! Enjoy.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  7. #46
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    Awesome, thanks so much for the input. Good info on the power supply instead of temp controller. Just so happen to have one lying around gathering dust!
    What are you using for your heat bed? Hard to see from the pictures of your luggage repair. Looks like a piece of glass on top of the cube plate and possibly heat element underneath?
    Which would you prefer, the heat bed or heating pad type thingie?



    Quote Originally Posted by Kame808 View Post
    I use that temperature controller from its own power supply. It is okay. The relay controls an external FET board to switch the power to the heat pad. The heat pad has its own dedicated high current power supply. That supply can be voltage adjusted without effecting the temperature controller. I added a kill switch to un-power the heat pad when the y axis drops. It would be nice if the temperature controller had a setting for a lower idle temperature maybe 30'c lower than the build temperature rather than just off. One day I will add that but I want to keep the effort on the 3d print designs and not the tools. You do not need to worry too much abut the temperature controller. Just hard wiring it to a voltage or current adjustable power supply would be sufficient.

    - - - - - - - - - -

    About a heated bed...I used one on the cube 3 for about a year now and am happy with the results. The full bed can be printed now with abs. I use only a light dusting of hairspray on glass. The added fans on the y axis keep heat from flowing to the cube 3. I have had some yellowing of the white plastic housing of the nozzles but I have reinforced the interface to the x axis slide with stainless steel sandwich. And sometimes the additional heat can trip the over heat switch between the nozzles cooling the nozzles and stripping the filament. Over course I have departed from the decorative box covering of the y axis. I was reluctant to remove the magnet but there has been no issue and bed leveling is rarely needed.

  8. #47
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    For a long time I had been getting by with carefully designed parts to mitigate the lack of a heated build plate. This included preheating the build plate with a silicone heater pad temporarily laid on the build plate before printing. Last year I wanted to print those train track in post #28 of this thread. They have large contact to the build plate and low height. I did not want to print them vertically. I could get the print glued down for printing but could not release it. Finally the lack of heated bed had to be addressed that I thought about many times. Post #26 shows the only way I could see to do it. The y axis decorative box is removed and not used. The three magnets are removed and also not used. A hole is cut to place what was the build plate below the three point mount. Now it was on track to follow typical heated build platforms with four corner standoffs rising to the aluminum heat spreader and attached silicone heat pad below. I print on 170mm square borosilicate glass you can find on eBay. The crucial step was cutting the hole it the original build platform to allow it to be below the three point magnet mount. I did not mind that as I have many cubes. I would suggest you just get two aluminum plates 170mm square and save the original cube build plate in case you do not like this approach. I found a seller on eBay that sells 6" square aluminum plates and asked if they would cut them for 170mm. They were sheared but the plates were not warped significantly and the glass build plate is the flat build surface. The aluminum heat spreader warps as it is heated anyway. The lower aluminum plate can be thicker to for support. Basically for this approach to adding a heated bed to the cube 3 you have to be willingly to cut a hole in an aluminum plate, remove the y axis decorative box and run with the magnetic mount. Otherwise it is the same as typical approaches. I did also add two fans to the y axis to hit the lower aluminum plate with airflow as it moves back and forth. I have begun to depart from the original cube 3 industrial design rather than just fixing the problems. I am sure there are other ways to add the heated bed but this is what I did. For the clips, I used ubiquitous modified binder clips removing the one edge with tin snips. Later when I had time I printed this handle to make it easier to set the clip. Oh, the temperature sensor... For testing I got cheap barbecue sensors from eBay to check the bed and lower platform and cube 3. Now I binder clip the temperature probe under the one edge clip of the glass plate. The temperature probe is from the controller you referenced. Some time in the future, I will fabricate my own heated bed from nichrome and mica sheet insulators. For now, I have a common 6" square silicone heat pad from eBay shown in post #40. The hardest part was just getting started but after one year I am comfortable using it every day.

    WP_20190329_10_12_01_Pro.jpgWP_20190329_23_01_32_Pro c.jpgWP_20190329_23_03_13_Pro c.jpg

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    I had some time to add some more photos....

    How I remove the clips.

    WP_20190928_07_58_41_Pro.jpgWP_20190928_07_58_54_Pro.jpg

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    The yellowing of the white shroud presumably due to the proximity of the heated bed.

    WP_20190928_07_23_52_Pro.jpg

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    The cutoff switch.

    WP_20190928_07_51_55_Pror1.jpgWP_20190928_07_55_43_Pror1.jpg

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    The thermistor mounted. The thermistor in the silicone heat pad was not compatible with the temperature controller.

    WP_20190929_16_44_36_Pro.jpg

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    One last caution. The lower aluminum plate has to clear a few points on the y axis hardware.

    Capture.JPG

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    WP_20190928_07_55_01_Pro1.jpgWP_20190929_17_08_35_Pro1.jpg
    Last edited by Kame808; 10-01-2019 at 12:18 AM.

  9. Thanks TommyDee thanked for this post
  10. #48
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    Bravo! Are you monitoring the power levels for certain temperatures?

  11. #49
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    If the temperature will increase then these temperature monitoring bed printer are reliable?

  12. #50
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    Thanks for the message. You have a straight forward approach. That is always good. I think there are always at least two good ways to solve something and often more. Your message was timely as I just completed one more platform. Twelve more to go. LoL I think I will wait on that. This time I used 1/16 aluminum for the bottom plate thereby avoiding re-purposing another original cube build platform. Originally I was worried about the rigidity but the 1/16" seems fine and it lowers the weight. I do not use the thermistor in the silicone heater and changed how I mount the the added on thermistor. The new thermistor is wrapped with copper foil and tucked between the glass and aluminum heat spreader. I took the chance to reevaluate this approach. I often print parts contacting the full area of the build surface so I need plenty of heat. After about 100 spools of abs I am addicted to printing directly on glass. The glass establishes a flat surface since the 100'c aluminum heat spreader will warp. Sometimes I will give just a light dusting of hairspray once in a while as I often do not use sidewalks. The heater runs at 180w I checked if the heat insulation was needed and while it runs without it is cooler to reflect the heat back up with the aluminum foil and slow the conduction of heat down. The small fans ensure heat is not conducted into the y-axis slide through the three point leveling arms. So I retained the insulator but just removed enough of the foam to seat the leveling arms without cutting through the top aluminum foil. The bottom plate sits 0.5mm above the z-axis mount on the left and 1mm above the y-axis belt pulleys. That places the top surface of the bottom plat 5mm below the the three leveling arms. I use four 18mm stainless steel corner spacers. About 0.5mm is trimmed off to flatten the top and bottom of the spacers. I think I could go to 16mm spacers and will try this on the next fabrication. The 18mm spacers puts the top of the glass that I print on about 2mm above the stock build platform. One benefit is that with he fixed platform and the parts sliding off the glass, it is rarely necessary to re-level.

    WP_20200126_09_38_53_Pro.jpgWP_20200126_10_26_20_Pro.jpgWP_20200126_09_38_18_Pro.jpgWP_20200127_08_39_19_Proc.jpgWP_20200127_08_39_54_Proc.jpgWP_20200201_14_46_23_Pro.jpg

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    The next project is to make a nichrome wire heater. I took another look at the silicone heater that burned out. I dissected some of the wires out. Oh that was interesting. It was ebay listed as having nichrome wire. The wire is actually coiled copper. That is not so good. The heated copper will begin to deteriorate with the heat. I confirmed the copper by tinning it and check with a magnet to see if the inner core was steel. If I can make my own I will have more control of the design and be able to customize the heater pattern for more uniform distribution.

    After some further thought on the coiled wire, I think it is legitimate. It is most likely nickel plated copper wire. Plating would prevent the deterioration with heat. The coiling would allow the resistance to be adjusted for a path length and increase the surface area. Nichrome wire has a higher resistance and around 12 feet would need to have a large diameter of around 0.1inch. A little inconvenient.

    WP_20200203_09_26_19_Pro.jpgWP_20200203_09_25_24_Pro.jpgWP_20200203_09_43_20_Pro.jpg
    Last edited by Kame808; 02-04-2020 at 07:59 PM.

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