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  1. #11
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Very nice salvage work.

    Is that a bias spring connected to a zip tie I see for keeping the plate still?

  2. #12
    3D Printer Noob
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    Actually the spring was added because the printer relies on gravity to 'zero' the z axis once it go up the max. However on this particular cube 3, the axis is a little sticky and wouldn't go down on it's own, I was having to manually push the build plate down after the initial plate movement before every print. So I added the spring and it works great to bring the plate down to zero. It doesn't have too much tension, just enough to assist gravity and work against the friction of the slide rail.

  3. #13
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    You might look for signs someone tried removing one of the vertical rails. If so, you might be able to get it back to parallel. Very tricky setup. Not a problem out of the factory on any I've seen.

  4. #14
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    Just saw this. That may have been the case. I chose to not make the issue possibly worse and add some ptfe grease. much smoother but still need the spring. It works well and folds back when the plate is at it's lowest.

  5. #15
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Most likely there was an assembly jig for quickly managing parallel rails.

    I do this manually on 3 meter systems. You have sneak up on it.
    Adjust one end with the carriage at that location, and cinch the screw down finger tight.
    Carefully move the carriage to the other end and repeat. Eventually it will run freely.
    Properly torque the screws and check again.

    Much easier to do if you can disengage the belt.

  6. #16
    3D Printer Noob
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    I found the T 24 error when the hot end would twist slightly and the dots on the head did not line up.A slight twist to line them back up corrected the error. I found this with a new stock unmodified printer. Most times on the head not being used at that time. this is my first post, been lurking here since start of the year. CNC builder for the last 17 years before I retired. Built 18 manufacturing grade machines ie. 6'x 14' x 12" bed pieces old fart but open to new fields. I have my own CNC router 42" x 28" x 4" cap. very new to the additive field, (70) mostly cut material away. You young bucks rock wish I was in my 20s again!!!

  7. #17
    Administrator bolsoncerrado's Avatar
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    So basically it's a "false contact" error rather than an actual temp error?

  8. #18
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    Physical contact, yes. You will also notice that if the nozzle is in cooling mode (screen meter makes you wait), if you twist the nozzle, it bring you back to the menu directly.

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  10. #19
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    When you say contact, do you mean the print head contact with the heat block? is there some circuit disruption going on when the nozzle 'untwists' to cause the t24?

  11. #20
    3D Printer God(dess)
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    Quote Originally Posted by ugn100 View Post
    When you say contact, do you mean the print head contact with the heat block? is there some circuit disruption going on when the nozzle 'untwists' to cause the t24?
    I keep thinking there is a "disturb detection" switch somewhere but I doubt it. Could be wrong.
    The spring in the hot-end makes sure (or should!) that the tip is pressed against the heart block.
    This creates a load on the heater. If the heater block sees a sudden temperature change, or a condition not expected, it throws out the error on the screen.
    Somewhere there is guide as to what the detected error was.
    The code presented on the screen is two digits; the first digit is the side of the printer, left or right, and the second digit is the error type.

 

 

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